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Young women with polycystic ovary syndrome are 5 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes

Date:
June 24, 2014
Source:
Monash University
Summary:
Young women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) have a startlingly higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, even if young and not overweight, a leading expert on reproductive health says. "With the dramatic rise in diabetes, this research highlights the need for greater awareness and screening, especially in high risk groups including young women with PCOS."

A leading expert on reproductive health says young women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) have a startlingly higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, even if young and not overweight.

The research led by Professor Helena Teede and Dr Anju Joham, from the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Monash University analysed a large-scale epidemiological study, called the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health, which revealed the findings.

Over 6000 women aged between 25-28 years were monitored for nine years, including 500 with diagnosed PCOS. The incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes was three to five times higher in women with PCOS. Crucially, obesity, a key trigger for type 2 diabetes, was not an important trigger in women with PCOS.

Professor Teede said the findings have significant implications for diabetes screening, as well as for the care of women with PCOS.

"Type 2 diabetes itself is preventable, as are diabetes complications, but only if people at risk of or who have diabetes are screened, aware and take preventative action," Professor Teede said.

"With the dramatic rise in diabetes, this research highlights the need for greater awareness and screening, especially in high risk groups including young women with PCOS."

The women studied were aged 25-28 in 2003 and were followed over 9 years until age 34 to 37 years in 2012.

Professor Teede said these are the peak reproductive years when undiagnosed diabetes could have significant risks for mothers and babies.

"Our research found that there is a clear link between PCOS and diabetes. However, PCOS is not a well-recognised diabetes risk factor and many young women with the condition don't get regular diabetes screening even pre pregnancy, despite recommendations from the Australian PCOS evidence based guidelines." She said.

"Currently diabetes screening guidelines recommend screening over 40 years of age. This may need to be reconsidered in women with PCOS. We clearly need more research in PCOS, with better screening, prevention and treatments."

Affecting around 1 in 5 women, the study also shows that many women with PCOS remain undiagnosed with what is the most common hormonal disorder in women. Symptoms can include irregular periods, weight gain, excessive facial hair and acne. PCOS is commonly managed with regular screening and prevention strategies, alongside lifestyle changes and medication.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Monash University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Monash University. "Young women with polycystic ovary syndrome are 5 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140624110555.htm>.
Monash University. (2014, June 24). Young women with polycystic ovary syndrome are 5 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140624110555.htm
Monash University. "Young women with polycystic ovary syndrome are 5 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140624110555.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

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