Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Hazardous drinking in UK athletes linked with alcohol industry sponsorship

Date:
July 2, 2014
Source:
Manchester University
Summary:
A link between alcohol sponsorship and hazardous drinking in UK athletes has been shown by researchers. The study is the first to examine alcohol sponsorship of athletes in the UK, and comes at a time when there are calls in the UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa for greater restriction or bans of alcohol sponsorship and advertising in sport.

New research from the University of Manchester (UK) and Monash University (Australia) shows a link between alcohol sponsorship and hazardous drinking in UK athletes.

The study, published online in the scientific journal Addiction, is the first to examine alcohol sponsorship of athletes in the UK, and comes at a time when there are calls in the UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa for greater restriction or bans of alcohol sponsorship and advertising in sport.

Researchers surveyed more than 2000 UK sportspeople from universities in the North West, Midlands, London, and Southern regions of England. Most of those surveyed played community sport, and around one third reported being sponsored by an alcohol-related industry such as a brewer or pub. Those receiving alcohol sponsorship reported greater alcohol consumption and had higher odds of hazardous drinking after accounting for factors such as type of sport played, age, gender, disposable income, and region.

Alcohol consumption was found to be high in athletes overall. However, 50% of those sponsored by an alcohol-related industry had scores on the World Health Organisation's Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test that indicated the need for brief counselling and further monitoring of drinking, compared with 39% for non-sponsored athletes.

Associate Professor Kerry O'Brien, who led the study, said "We have known for some time that excessive drinking is more common in young adults who play sport or are fans, but we are just starting to understand why. It looks like alcohol sponsorship and the drinking culture it perpetuates could be one of these reasons."

The study, funded by Alcohol Research UK, mirrors findings from countries such as Australia and New Zealand, which have similar alcohol and sport sponsorship and advertising arrangements. However, the study went further by testing the alcohol industry's argument that the effect of sponsorship on alcohol consumption may be unique to New Zealand or caused by heavy drinkers seeking out alcohol sponsorship. The study found that the effect of sponsorship on drinking persisted even after accounting for sponsorship seeking and other factors.

Asked whether the perceived social and health benefits of sport might be compromised by the use of sport for the promotion of alcohol, Dr O'Brien said, "I think most people would agree that sport is an important marketing tool for the alcohol, gambling, and fast foods industries, in much the same way it was for tobacco. Our study raises the question of whether sports that have such sponsorships and advertising might promote poorer health and social outcomes.

Although participation in sport appears to protect children against illicit drug, cigarette and alcohol use, the situation reverses as athletes approach legal drinking age and engage in more hazardous drinking."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Manchester University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kerry S. O'Brien, Jason Ferris, Ian Greenlees, Sophia Jowett, Daniel Rhind, Penny A. Cook, Kypros Kypri. Alcohol industry sponsorship and hazardous drinking in UK university students who play sport. Addiction, 2014; DOI: 10.1111/add.12604

Cite This Page:

Manchester University. "Hazardous drinking in UK athletes linked with alcohol industry sponsorship." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140702092920.htm>.
Manchester University. (2014, July 2). Hazardous drinking in UK athletes linked with alcohol industry sponsorship. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140702092920.htm
Manchester University. "Hazardous drinking in UK athletes linked with alcohol industry sponsorship." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140702092920.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) A study by German researchers claims watching TV while you're stressed out can make you feel guilty and like a failure. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

AFP (July 24, 2014) China's elderly population is expanding so quickly that children struggle to look after them, pushing them to do something unexpected in Chinese society- move their parents into a nursing home. Duration: 02:07 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins