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Teeth protein promises bone regeneration

Date:
July 2, 2014
Source:
Queen Mary, University of London
Summary:
Patients suffering from osteoporosis or bone fractures might benefit from a new discovery of a protein that plays an important role in bone regeneration made by bioengineers. Normally found in the formation of enamel, which is an important component of teeth, the scientists discovered that a partial segment of the protein statherin can be used to signal bone growth.

Patients suffering from osteoporosis or bone fractures might benefit from a new discovery of a protein that plays an important role in bone regeneration made by bioengineers at Queen Mary University of London.

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Normally found in the formation of enamel, which is an important component of teeth, the scientists discovered that a partial segment of the protein statherin can be used to signal bone growth.

"What is surprising and encouraging about this research is that we can now use this particular molecule to signal cells and enhance bone growth within the body," said co-author Dr Alvaro Mata from QMUL's School of Engineering and Materials Science and the Institute of Bioengineering.

Publishing in the journal Biomaterials, the team created bioactive membranes made from segments of different proteins to show which protein in particular played the crucial role. They demonstrated the bone stimulating effect in a rat model, and used analytical techniques to visualise and measure the newly formed calcified tissue.

Co-author Dr Esther Tejeda-Montes, also at QMUL's School of Engineering and Materials Science said: "The benefit of creating a membrane of proteins using these molecules means it can be both bioactive and easily handled to apply over injured areas in the bone."

Dr Mata added: "Our work enables the possibility to create robust synthetic bone grafts that can be tuned to stimulate the natural regenerative process, which is limited in most synthetic bone graft alternatives."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queen Mary, University of London. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Esther Tejeda-Montes, Alexey Klymov, M. Reza Nejadnik, Matilde Alonso, J.Carlos Rodriguez-Cabello, X. Frank Walboomers, Alvaro Mata. Mineralization and bone regeneration using a bioactive elastin-like recombinamer membrane. Biomaterials, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2014.05.095

Cite This Page:

Queen Mary, University of London. "Teeth protein promises bone regeneration." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140702122426.htm>.
Queen Mary, University of London. (2014, July 2). Teeth protein promises bone regeneration. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140702122426.htm
Queen Mary, University of London. "Teeth protein promises bone regeneration." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140702122426.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

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