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Immune system component found that resists sepsis in mice

Date:
July 9, 2014
Source:
University of Southern California - Health Sciences
Summary:
Mice lacking a specific component of the immune system are completely resistant to sepsis, a potentially fatal complication of infection, molecular microbiologists report. The discovery suggests that blocking this immune system component may help reduce inflammation in human autoimmune and hyper-inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and Type 2 diabetes.

Molecular microbiologists from the Keck School of Medicine of USC have discovered that mice lacking a specific component of the immune system are completely resistant to sepsis, a potentially fatal complication of infection. The discovery suggests that blocking this immune system component may help reduce inflammation in human autoimmune and hyper-inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and Type 2 diabetes.

The study was published online on June 23 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, a leading peer-reviewed scientific journal in research medicine and immunology.

The immune system is the body's first line of defense against infection. The system, however, can also injure the body if it is not turned off after the infection is destroyed, or if it is turned on when there is no infection at all. Scientists do not yet fully understand how the immune response is turned on and off and continue to study it in hopes of harnessing its power to cure disease.

In this study, scientists have found that a component of the system, HOIL-1L, is necessary for formation of the NLRP3-ASC inflammasome signaling complex.

"This regulatory mechanism is critical in vivo, where we find that mice lacking HOIL-1L are completely resistant to sepsis, which is a lethal inflammation model of human sepsis," said Mary Rodgers, PhD, USC postdoctoral fellow and the study's first author. "Our results suggest that blocking the activity of HOIL-1L could be a new therapeutic strategy for reducing inflammation in disease."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Southern California - Health Sciences. The original article was written by Alison Trinidad. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. M. A. Rodgers, J. W. Bowman, H. Fujita, N. Orazio, M. Shi, Q. Liang, R. Amatya, T. J. Kelly, K. Iwai, J. Ting, J. U. Jung. The linear ubiquitin assembly complex (LUBAC) is essential for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Journal of Experimental Medicine, 2014; 211 (7): 1333 DOI: 10.1084/jem.20132486

Cite This Page:

University of Southern California - Health Sciences. "Immune system component found that resists sepsis in mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140709095933.htm>.
University of Southern California - Health Sciences. (2014, July 9). Immune system component found that resists sepsis in mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140709095933.htm
University of Southern California - Health Sciences. "Immune system component found that resists sepsis in mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140709095933.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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