Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Financial weight makes it trickier to lose pounds where it counts

Date:
August 19, 2014
Source:
Concordia University
Summary:
Weight-loss advertising tends to target people ready, willing and able to pay for diet programs, special meals or gym memberships. But it's those who live below the poverty line who are more likely to be overweight or obese.

Weight-loss advertising tends to target people ready, willing and able to pay for diet programs, special meals or gym memberships. But it's those who live below the poverty line who are more likely to be overweight or obese.

Related Articles


When it comes to weight-loss for the poor, it turns out that it's more than just cash-flow that stands in the way. A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine by researchers from Concordia University shows that those who struggle the most financially also are less likely to constructively battle the bulge through exercise, drinking water, or reducing fat or sweets compared to those in the highest income bracket.

"The message of how to lose weight according to national guidelines may not resonate with those who struggle to pay their bills," says Lisa Kakinami, a researcher with Concordia University's PERFORM Centre and the lead author on the study.

Rather than switch up their dietary habits or pursue an exercise routine, lower-income individuals are more inclined to pop diet pills -- which may be counterproductive in the long run. But even the strategies that are essentially free hold little appeal as an alternative approach.

"Certain methods can be pursued no matter where you are, but the inclination to reduce fat or sweets, exercise or drink more water was lesser in lower-income households compared to the highest-income households," says Kakinami, who is also a professor in Concordia's Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

Despite a decent awareness level by the study's participants about these basic weight-loss tactics, following through on them remains a different matter, especially for those hovering around or below the poverty line.

Rather, the preference is toward methods that provide the feeling of instant results -- which end up being harmful in the long run, if they work at all. Strategies used by younger Americans raised in poorer households were particularly inconsistent with national guidelines as they were less likely than young Americans from the highest income households to exercise, but were more likely to fast or skip meals instead.

Regardless, the findings derived from data gathered from the over 8,800 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Study point to an ongoing message gap, as the widespread pursuit of the quickest possible fix has done nothing to reduce obesity levels.

And those who can't afford the more advanced methods of nutrition or fitness management face more drastic consequences on the rebound.

Certainly, the volume of research into obesity has not been enough to reverse the trend. Kakinami is among the academics who want their work to influence a public health revolution.

"Perhaps all the studies that have been done about weight are becoming muddled in people's minds," she says. "Maybe it's time to take a step back and evaluate what people know and understand about obesity and weight-loss."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Concordia University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lisa Kakinami, Lise Gauvin, Tracie A. Barnett, Gilles Paradis. Trying to Lose Weight. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2014; 46 (6): 585 DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.01.022

Cite This Page:

Concordia University. "Financial weight makes it trickier to lose pounds where it counts." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140819155314.htm>.
Concordia University. (2014, August 19). Financial weight makes it trickier to lose pounds where it counts. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140819155314.htm
Concordia University. "Financial weight makes it trickier to lose pounds where it counts." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140819155314.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins