Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Epigenetic changes in children with Crohn's disease seen in study

Date:
August 22, 2014
Source:
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Summary:
A wide range of epigenetic changes -— alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures -— in children with Crohn's disease (CD), has been observed and reported in a new study. Crohn's disease is a painful, medically incurable illness that may attack anywhere along the digestive system. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which involves only the large intestine (colon), are the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease.

A new study finds a wide range of epigenetic changes -- alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures -- in children with Crohn's disease (CD), reports Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA). The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Related Articles


The study provides "compelling evidence" of alterations of DNA in several regions of the genome in children with CD, according to Professor Jack Satsangi of University of Edinburgh and colleagues. In addition to providing new insights into how genes and the environment interact, the results may have early implications for clinical management of CD.

Epigenetic Changes in Childhood-Onset Crohn's Disease

The researchers performed a "genome-wide" study in children with newly diagnosed CD, before any treatment, to look for possible epigenetic changes that may affect gene behavior. Epigenetic changes reflect the impact of a wide range of environmental factors on genes.

The results showed strong evidence of such changes at 65 different sites across the genome. Nineteen sites showed clustering of epigenetic changes, pointing at genetic pathways that might be relevant to CD development.

Similar patterns were present in a separate group of children who had been treated for CD, as well as in a group of treated adults.

The study highlighted "highly significant" changes in two specific gene locations (loci), which include genes responsible for immune and cellular functions that could contribute to the development of CD. Two probes for these loci were highly accurate in predicting which children would have CD, providing a potentially useful "biomarker" for use as a diagnostic test.

'Exciting and Immediate Implications' for Clinical Management

One specific gene location seemed particularly important, as it has been implicated in a number of different cancers, including colorectal cancer. The same area has a known role in the development of T-cells, a key type of immune cell.

The study also identified a number of other loci that might play a role in the development of CD, warranting further study.

The new research adds to the growing body of evidence of epigenetic changes in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. The findings highlight the importance of combining information on DNA changes, genes, and gene expression in future studies of these and other complex diseases, Dr Satsangi and colleagues believe.

Crohn's disease is a painful, medically incurable illness that may attack anywhere along the digestive system. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which involves only the large intestine (colon), are the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease. Some 1.4 million American adults and children suffer from CD or ulcerative colitis. Although much more research is needed to understand the epigenetic changes, the investigators believe their findings could lead to advances in clinical management of childhood-onset CD in the near future. They write, "There are exciting and immediate implications for early clinical translation; the discovery of easily accessible biomarkers in peripheral blood to predict disease susceptibility, progression or response to therapy and the potential for new therapeutic targets."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Alex T. Adams, Nicholas A. Kennedy, Richard Hansen, Nicholas T. Ventham, Kate R. OʼLeary, Hazel E. Drummond, Colin L. Noble, Emad El-Omar, Richard K. Russell, David C. Wilson, Elaine R. Nimmo, Georgina L. Hold, Jack Satsangi. Two-stage Genome-wide Methylation Profiling in Childhood-onset Crohnʼs Disease Implicates Epigenetic Alterations at the VMP1/MIR21 and HLA Loci. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 2014; 1 DOI: 10.1097/MIB.0000000000000179

Cite This Page:

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. "Epigenetic changes in children with Crohn's disease seen in study." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140822094055.htm>.
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. (2014, August 22). Epigenetic changes in children with Crohn's disease seen in study. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140822094055.htm
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. "Epigenetic changes in children with Crohn's disease seen in study." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140822094055.htm (accessed March 26, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) Indiana Gov. Mike Pence says he will bring additional state resources to help stop the epidemic. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Reuters - US Online Video (Mar. 26, 2015) Governor Mike Pence declares the recent HIV outbreak in rural Indiana a "public health emergency" and authorizes a short-term needle-exchange program. Rough Cut (no reporter narration) Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AP (Mar. 25, 2015) While distracted driving is not a new problem for teens, new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety says it&apos;s much more serious than previously thought. (March 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins