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Graphene withstands high pressure, may aid in desalination

Used in filtration membranes, ultrathin material could help make desalination more productive

Date:
April 24, 2017
Source:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Summary:
Used in filtration membranes, ultrathin material could help make desalination more productive, explain researchers in a new report.
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On the left, an atomic-force microscopy image shows a nanoporous graphene membrane after a burst test at 100 bars. The image shows that failed micromembranes (the dark black areas) are aligned with wrinkles in the graphene. On the right, two zoomed-in scanning electron microscopy images of graphene membranes show the before (top) and after of a burst test at pressure difference of 30 bars. The images illustrate that membrane failure is associated with intrinsic defects along wrinkles.
Credit: Courtesy of the researchers

Professor Klaus Ley, M.D., has been selected as this year's winner of the Eugene M. Landis Award, the Microcirculatory Society's top honor, in recognition of his pioneering work in vascular biology and microcirculation. The microcirculation comprises all the small blood vessels in all tissues and organs and their contents (blood plasma and blood cells).

A member of the Microcirculatory Society since 1990, Dr. Ley will present his Landis Award Lecture on Leukocyte Integrin Activation on April 23, 2017, during the annual Experimental Biology Meeting in Chicago. Each year, the Eugene M. Landis Award recognizes an outstanding investigator in the field of microcirculation who has published and continues to provide meritorious research in the field of microcirculation.

"It is an incredible honor to receive the Landis Award from the Microcirculatory Society," said Dr. Ley, whose research on microcirculation started 35 years ago, when he discovered the regulation of microvascular permeability by oxygen free radicals.

"If I had known back then what we know now, I would have studied immunology earlier. The immune system is the way to manipulate inflammation, prevent and cure many diseases, including cardiovascular disease."

Today, Dr. Ley's work centers mostly on the inflammatory component of atherosclerosis, defined as build-up of deposits, or plaques, of cholesterol, calcium, and inflammatory cells in arteries. Over time, plaques limit blood flow, and, if they obstruct a vessel like the coronary artery, can trigger a heart attack. Plaque rupture also increases the chance of stroke or blood clots in the brain.

Since it is actually the inflammation emerging at sites of vessel tissue damage that encourages arterial plaque buildup in the first place, Dr. Ley is actively working on an anti-inflammatory heart vaccine aimed at dialing down inflammation in affected arteries. His other research interests include the study of neutrophils, a type of white blood cells important for inflammation, activation of integrins, a type of adhesion molecule, and bioinformatics.


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Materials provided by Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Luda Wang, Christopher M. Williams, Michael S. H. Boutilier, Piran R. Kidambi, Rohit Karnik. Single-Layer Graphene Membranes Withstand Ultrahigh Applied Pressure. Nano Letters, 2017; DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b00442

Cite This Page:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "Graphene withstands high pressure, may aid in desalination: Used in filtration membranes, ultrathin material could help make desalination more productive." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 April 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170424110847.htm>.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (2017, April 24). Graphene withstands high pressure, may aid in desalination: Used in filtration membranes, ultrathin material could help make desalination more productive. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 26, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170424110847.htm
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "Graphene withstands high pressure, may aid in desalination: Used in filtration membranes, ultrathin material could help make desalination more productive." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170424110847.htm (accessed May 26, 2017).

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