Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Pioneering Surgery At UIC Medical Center Saves Twins

Date:
February 14, 1997
Source:
University of Illinois at Chicago
Summary:
A condition once considered hopeless for 6,000 identical twin babies each year in the United States is now being treated with a new, pioneering laser surgical procedure.

CHICAGO, Ill. (2/13/1997) -- A condition once considered hopeless for 6,000 identical twin babies eachyear in the United States is now being treated with a new, pioneering lasersurgical procedure developed by Dr. Julian E. De Lia, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Universityof Illinois at Chicago Medical Center.

Related Articles


The condition, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, occurs when identicaltwins share a single placenta, with blood vessel connections allowingpassage of blood from one twin into the other. In severe cases, the"donor" twin becomes very anemic and the "recipient" twin becomesoverloaded with fluid and develops heart failure. Without treatment, themost likely outcome is death of one or both twins. Or, if the twinssurvive, birth defects or cerebral palsy can result.

De Lia is one of only a handful of surgeons around the world who performthis procedure, with patients coming to him from 20 states and Canada. Hesaw his first case of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome in 1983 at theUniversity of Utah Medical Center. Over the next several years, he didresearch and developed an in-utero laser surgical technique that he beganusing in 1988.

In the procedure, the mother is given anesthesia and a thin,telescope-like device called a fetoscope is inserted into the abdomenthrough a small incision. The placental vessels connecting the twins canbe seen through the fetoscope. De Lia then fires a surgical laser at thevessels through the fetoscope to seal or cauterize the connecting vessels.The procedure takes only 30 to 45 minutes.

De Lia has performed about 70 of the operations, including seven since hecame to the UIC Medical Center last September. In about 75 to 80 percentof the cases at least one twin survived, and in 65 to 70 percent both twinssurvived, with neurological damage occurring in less than 5 percent of thebabies and with no ill effects on the mothers.

"Twins are a special blessing to most people, and it's a double tragedyif they end up losing both children," says De Lia. "So for me, it's verygratifying to save these lives.

"I've come up with something that, a few years ago, did not exist inmedicine. Now that we're have perfected this procedure, I face thechallenges of teaching others how to perform the surgery and disseminatinginformation to parents and the medical community about its availability."

(Editors: For more information, call Danny Chun, (312) 996-2269. Internet:dchun@uic.edu)

Danny Chun (dchun@uic.edu)Media Relations/University of Illinois at ChicagoColleges of Medicine, Nursing, DentistryPH: 312-996-2269 FAX: 312-996-3754Office of Public Affairs (M/C 288)601 South Morgan StreetChicago, IL 60607


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Illinois at Chicago. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Illinois at Chicago. "Pioneering Surgery At UIC Medical Center Saves Twins." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 February 1997. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/02/970214054027.htm>.
University of Illinois at Chicago. (1997, February 14). Pioneering Surgery At UIC Medical Center Saves Twins. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/02/970214054027.htm
University of Illinois at Chicago. "Pioneering Surgery At UIC Medical Center Saves Twins." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/02/970214054027.htm (accessed January 25, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

AFP (Jan. 25, 2015) The World Health Organization&apos;s chief on Sunday admitted the UN agency had been caught napping on Ebola, saying it should serve a lesson to avoid similar mistakes in future. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Newsy (Jan. 24, 2015) Much of the Disneyland measles outbreak is being blamed on the anti-vaccination movement. The CDC encourages just about everyone get immunized. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

AP (Jan. 23, 2015) Public health officials are rushing to contain a measles outbreak that has sickened 70 people across 6 states and Mexico. The AP&apos;s Raquel Maria Dillon has more. (Jan. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 23, 2015) A Boston start-up is developing a wristband they say will help users break bad habits by jolting them with an electric shock. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins