Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Genetically Engineering Longer-Lasting Antibodies Could Lead To Better Therapeutic Drugs

Date:
July 28, 1997
Source:
UT Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas
Summary:
Delivering drugs to fetuses and fighting such diseases as cancer and autoimmunity may be greatly enhanced by altering a common antibody so that it stays in the blood stream longer, according to researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.

DALLAS -- July 25, 1997 -- Delivering drugs to fetuses andfighting such diseases as cancer and autoimmunity may be greatlyenhanced by altering a common antibody so that it stays in theblood stream longer, according to researchers at UT SouthwesternMedical Center at Dallas.

Related Articles


By taking a portion of the natural antibody IgG and usingprotein engineering techniques, the scientists found they couldisolate fragments that bound with higher affinity or force to the Fcreceptor, FcRn. This receptor is involved in regulating the levelof gamma globulin, the part of the blood containing mostantibodies, in many mammals. In rodents and humans, it also isbelieved to be part of the pathway that transfers antibodies acrossthe placenta from mother to child. The research, published in arecent issue of Nature Biotechnology, showed that manipulatingthe antibody extended its half-life in the circulation of mice.

"We thought if we could increase the binding affinity of anIgG fragment for FcRn, then it would have a longer serumhalf-life than the endogenous (naturally occurring) IgGs," said Dr.E. Sally Ward, associate professor of microbiology and CancerImmunobiology Center researcher. "We mutated antibodyfragments called Fc fragments and selected ones that bound betterto FcRn."

Antibodies are Y-shaped proteins with IgG being the mostcommon type. The long arm of IgG is the Fc fragment, which isthe non-antigen binding portion of the molecule and carries outtasks called effector functions.

Because a very similar Fc receptor is found in humans,Ward said their research could be applicable to people. Since thealtered antibodies are more persistent in the blood, smalleramounts of therapeutic antibodies made with this technologywould be needed. Therefore, the necessity for repeated doseswould be reduced. This approach also could be used to isolatesmaller molecules that have high affinity for bonding to FcRn.These molecules could then be used to tag drugs.

"If the drugs have a longer serum persistence, then it willbe cheaper and more economically attractive for patients," Wardsaid. "We also believe this tighter binding of the IgG fragment toFcRn will transfer antibody across the placenta moreefficiently."

This means it may be possible to deliver therapeuticantibodies or drugs to fetuses in cases where the mothers have adisease such as AIDS, she said.

The UT Southwestern investigators found that the mutantantibody fragment had a binding affinity for FcRn that is 3.5 timeshigher than the unaltered Fc fragment from which it was derived.In one strain of laboratory mouse, the amount of mutated antibodystill effectively circulating in the blood 20 days after injection ofIgG was four times greater than with the parent antibody. It wastwice as much in another strain.

Other researchers involved in this study were Dr. VictorGhetie, associate professor of microbiology; Dr. Sergei Popov,assistant instructor of pharmacology; research fellows, JozefBorvak and Dr. Corneliu Medesan; former UT Southwesternresearch fellows Caius Radu and Diana Matesoi; and Dr.Raimund Ober, a collaborator from The University of Texas atDallas.

The study was funded by grants from the National Institutesof Health, the Welch Foundation and the Texas AdvancedResearch Program.

###

This news release is available on our World Wide Web homepage at http://www.swmed.edu/news/newspubs.htm/


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by UT Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

UT Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. "Genetically Engineering Longer-Lasting Antibodies Could Lead To Better Therapeutic Drugs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 July 1997. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/07/970728215147.htm>.
UT Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. (1997, July 28). Genetically Engineering Longer-Lasting Antibodies Could Lead To Better Therapeutic Drugs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/07/970728215147.htm
UT Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. "Genetically Engineering Longer-Lasting Antibodies Could Lead To Better Therapeutic Drugs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/07/970728215147.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 6, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Just A Half-Hour Of Lost Sleep Could Lead To Weight Gain

Just A Half-Hour Of Lost Sleep Could Lead To Weight Gain

Newsy (Mar. 6, 2015) A new study found losing just half an hour of sleep could make you gain weight. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Suicide Rates Up For Young Women In U.S.

Suicide Rates Up For Young Women In U.S.

Newsy (Mar. 6, 2015) According to a report from the CDC, suicide rates among young women increased from 1994 to 2012 while rates among young men have decreased. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Bupa is hoping to expand in India&apos;s fast-growing health insurance market, once a rule change on foreign investment is implemented. The British private healthcare group&apos;s CEO tells Grace Pascoe why it&apos;s so keen on the new opportunity. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) Liberia&apos;s last Ebola patient has been released, and the country hasn&apos;t recorded a new case in a week. However, fears of another outbreak still exist. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins