Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Vitamin E Prevents Early Plaque Formation In Arteries

Date:
November 25, 1998
Source:
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas
Summary:
In laboratory tests vitamin E prevented the early stages of plaque formation by preventing white blood cells from sticking to cells that line the artery wall # another weapon in the antioxidant’s attack on heart disease, according to research at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.

DALLAS - November 24, 1998 - In laboratory tests vitamin E prevented the early stages of plaque formation by preventing white blood cells from sticking to cells that line the artery wall -- another weapon in the antioxidant’s attack on heart disease, according to research at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.

The study, the first to examine how vitamin E-enrichment of these white plaque-producing cells -- called monocytes -- affects adhesion to the cells that line arteries, was published in the November 24 edition of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

“This beneficial effect of vitamin E further strengthens its role as an adjunctive therapy in the management of atherosclerosis,” said lead author Dr. Ishwarlal Jialal, a professor of pathology and internal medicine at UT Southwestern.

Scientists, including the UT Southwestern researchers, had already established that vitamin E can reduce susceptibility to atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, because it inhibits the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol. Two years ago, work by Jialal and Dr. Sridevi Devaraj, an instructor of pathology at UT Southwestern, showed the first intracellular effect of vitamin E – that it suppressed the function of monocytes.

The monocyte is the critical cell in early plaque development. An early stage of artery- clogging plaque involves the attachment of the monocyte to human endothelial cells – the artery wall. Preventing this step could be another important target in the treatment of atherosclerosis, said Jialal, who is also a senior investigator in the Center for Human Nutrition at UT Southwestern.

The laboratory study examined the effect that vitamin E had on the monocyte’s ability to bind itself to endothelial cells.

“These and other studies support the concept that the possible beneficial effects of vitamin E supplementation in reducing coronary-artery disease can be attributed to its combined effects on inhibition of the oxidative modification of lipoproteins and its intracellular effects on cells critical in atherogenesis, such as monocytes,” Jialal said.

While enrichment of monocytes with vitamin E decreased adhesion to endothelium, enrichment of both monocytes and endothelial cells resulted in greater inhibition of adhesion, the work showed.

“This is most likely what is occurring when one ingests vitamin E since it gets in all cell membranes,” Jialal said.

This also represents the first demonstration that vitamin E has effects at the nuclear level on an important transcription factor. It inhibited the transcription factor NF-kappaB that is important for adhesion and inflammation. Jialal said they have elucidated the molecular events that cause vitamin E to decrease clogged arteries: It inhibits this transcription factor and decreases adhesion molecules, resulting in less adhesion of monocytes to the endothelium. These actions reduce plaque formation.

Humans can obtain this response by taking vitamin E supplements.

Kazi Islam, a fellow in the Center of Human Nutrition, also participated in the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. "Vitamin E Prevents Early Plaque Formation In Arteries." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 November 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/11/981125045414.htm>.
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. (1998, November 25). Vitamin E Prevents Early Plaque Formation In Arteries. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/11/981125045414.htm
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. "Vitamin E Prevents Early Plaque Formation In Arteries." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/11/981125045414.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Cost of Ebola

The Cost of Ebola

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 18, 2014) As Sierra Leone prepares for a three-day "lockdown" in its latest bid to stem the spread of Ebola, Ciara Lee looks at the financial implications of fighting the largest ever outbreak of the disease. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
What HealthKit Bug Means For Your iOS Fitness Apps

What HealthKit Bug Means For Your iOS Fitness Apps

Newsy (Sep. 18, 2014) Apple has delayed the launch of the HealthKit app platform, citing a bug. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Residents Vaccinated as Haiti Fights Cholera Epidemic

Residents Vaccinated as Haiti Fights Cholera Epidemic

AFP (Sep. 18, 2014) Haitians receive the second dose of the vaccine against cholera as part of the UN's vaccination campaign. Duration: 00:34 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) Doctors once thought artificial sweeteners lacked the health risks of sugar, but a new study says they can impact blood sugar levels the same way. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins