Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cherry Hamburgers Lower In Suspected Carcinogens

Date:
December 15, 1998
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Eat your fruit. It's good for you even in hamburgers! Cherry hamburgers may be healthier for you than regular hamburgers, based on the results of a study by scientists looking into this unusual combination.

Combining Fruit Tissue With Ground Beef Also Slows Meat Spoilage

Eat your fruit. It's good for you even in hamburgers! Cherry hamburgers may be healthier for you than regular hamburgers, based on the results of a study by scientists looking into this unusual combination.

Adding cherries to hamburger meat retards spoilage and reduces the formation of suspected cancer-causing compounds known as HAAs (heterocyclic aromatic amines), according to researchers at Michigan State University. Previous research into the effect of combining cherry tissue with ground beef has shown the resulting product to be lower in fat, yet juicier and more tender than pure beef burgers.

Cherry burgers are an increasingly popular food item, particularly on school lunch menus in 16 states, and the subject of research reported in the Nov. 7 web edition of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, published by the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. The article will appear in the Dec. 21 print edition of the peer-reviewed journal.

"Cherry tissue will not only slow down the oxidative deterioration of meat lipids but will also substantially reduce the formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines," says J. Ian Gray, Ph.D., professor of food science at Michigan State University in East Lansing. HAAs are formed naturally during cooking. Many of them have been determined to cause cancer in some animals and are suspected to be carcinogenic in humans. A primary cause of off-flavor, lipid oxidation also causes discoloring and texture change of meat during storage.

In the study, MSU researchers found that ground beef patties containing 15 percent fat and 11.5 percent tart cherry tissue had "significantly" fewer HAAs when pan fried, compared to patties without cherry tissue added. The overall HAA reduction ranged from nearly 69 percent to 78.5 percent. The reduction is "clearly due to cherry components functioning as inhibitors of the reaction(s) leading to HAA formation," according to the journal article. Measurements done during the study showed that the fat content of cherry patties was lower than that of regular patties, but the moisture content was greater, thereby verifying early findings.

Cherry burgers are on school menus in 16 states as part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture National School Lunch Program, according to Ray Pleva, the northern Michigan butcher and cherry grower who created the product. The states, he says, are Arizona, California, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Washington and West Virginia. Earlier this year, a member of the Michigan Legislature proposed, unsuccessfully, that they be proclaimed as the official Michigan state burger.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Cherry Hamburgers Lower In Suspected Carcinogens." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 December 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/12/981215080511.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (1998, December 15). Cherry Hamburgers Lower In Suspected Carcinogens. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/12/981215080511.htm
American Chemical Society. "Cherry Hamburgers Lower In Suspected Carcinogens." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/12/981215080511.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) A Texas man is lucky to be alive after he and three others floated for more than a day in the Gulf of Mexico when their boat sank during a fishing trip. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Since the arrival of Ebola in Ivory Coast, Ivorians have been abandoning their pets, particularly monkeys, in the fear that they may transmit the virus. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) New findings suggest men with a certain type of baldness at age 45 are 39 percent more likely to develop aggressive prostate cancer. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins