Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

'Shock Therapy' Exceeds Expectations In Cleaning Up Contaminated Soils

Date:
April 1, 1999
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Researchers have removed up to 99 percent of trichloroethylene from contaminated soil during the first field tests of an innovative remediation method called Lasagna™ technology, which uses electrical current fed to electrodes buried in the ground.

Cost-Effective Approach has Potential for Wide Use

Related Articles


Researchers have removed up to 99 percent of trichloroethylene from contaminated soil during the first field tests of an innovative remediation method called Lasagna™ technology, which uses electrical current fed to electrodes buried in the ground.

Trichloroethylene is used for cleaning and degreasing metal, in the production of rubber and plastics, in dry cleaning processes and in household solvents. It has been associated with a possible increased risk of cancer in people.

The tests exceeded the researchers' expectations for remediation of the soil, according to two related research articles in the April 1 print edition of the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science & Technology, published by the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

Scientists from Monsanto, General Electric and DuPont describe the Lasagna technology as "very successful" and claim it is cost-effective in cleaning up trichloroethylene-contaminated soil in place. The research was initially published on the journal's web site Feb. 25.

Called "lasagna" because of the layered placement of 'treatment zones' within the buried electrodes, "the technology utilizes an electrical current to drive contaminants from soil into in situ treatment zones for destruction," says the report's lead author, Sa V. Ho, Ph.D., of the Monsanto Company in St. Louis, Mo. Doing the treatment in place, rather than moving it to a central remediation site, means "the technology has minimal disturbance to the environment, generates no waste, can be cost-effective and has the potential for wide application," he claims.

Applying electricity to the electrodes, which were buried up to 45 feet deep in the larger of two field tests that were conducted, causes water in the soil to move toward the electrodes and into the treatment zones where iron filings mixed with clay destroy (dechlorinate) the trichloroethylene carried by the water. All the materials used in the electrodes and treatment zones "are innocuous to the environment and are designed to be left in place after the cleanup is completed," claims the research article.

The Lasagna testing, done in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, was conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Ky., which produces enriched uranium. The U.S. Department of Energy, original owner of the plant, is responsible for environmental restoration of the plant's land, consisting mostly of low permeability clay that is "very difficult to treat with other technologies," notes Ho.

Kentucky officials initially had called for concentrations of trichloroethylene in the soil at the Paducah site, which ranged as high as 300 parts per million (ppm) prior to the Lasagna treatment, to be reduced to no more than five ppm. Following treatment, the contamination levels were as low as 0.2 ppm in some cases.

Lasagna treatment should range from $45 to $80 per cubic yard for contaminated sites of about one acre, compared to $200 to $1,000 for traditional excavation and incineration treatment, says Ho.

A nonprofit organization with a membership of nearly 159,000 chemists and chemical engineers, the American Chemical Society publishes scientific journals and databases, convenes major research conferences, and provides educational, science policy and career programs in chemistry. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "'Shock Therapy' Exceeds Expectations In Cleaning Up Contaminated Soils." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 April 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/04/990401061033.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (1999, April 1). 'Shock Therapy' Exceeds Expectations In Cleaning Up Contaminated Soils. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/04/990401061033.htm
American Chemical Society. "'Shock Therapy' Exceeds Expectations In Cleaning Up Contaminated Soils." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/04/990401061033.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) — In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Monarch Butterflies Descend Upon Mexican Forest During Annual Migration

Monarch Butterflies Descend Upon Mexican Forest During Annual Migration

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 19, 2014) — Millions of monarch butterflies begin to descend onto Mexico as part of their annual migration south. Rough Cut (no reporter narration) Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) — The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Birds Might Be Better Meteorologists Than Us

Birds Might Be Better Meteorologists Than Us

Newsy (Dec. 19, 2014) — A new study suggests a certain type of bird was able to sense a tornado outbreak that moved through the U.S. a day before it hit. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins