Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Clemson Helps Homeowners Prepare For Future Hurricanes

Date:
September 23, 1999
Source:
Clemson University
Summary:
Property owners may be better prepared for the next hurricane to strike South Carolina thanks to Clemson University wind research and partnership efforts to put that information in the hands of the people who need it.

CLEMSON, S.C.-- Property owners may be better prepared for the next hurricane to strike South Carolina thanks to Clemson University wind research and partnership efforts to put that information in the hands of the people who need it.

Related Articles


On Sept. 21, the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Hugo, Clemson is releasing a how-to guide for homeowners on ways to make both new and older homes stronger against the ravages of high wind.

Additional outreach efforts include Clemson's support of a demonstration site in Charleston and the hiring of a full-time coastal hazards specialist to work directly with homeowners, builders, engineers and architects on improved construction techniques and mitigation of hazards such as hurricanes, floods and earthquakes.

Clemson President Constantine W. "Deno" Curris said, "As a land-grant university, Clemson's role is not just to create new knowledge through research, but also to take the results of research directly to the people. These projects are perfect examples of how Clemson's tripartite mission of teaching, research and outreach can serve the needs of the state."

The how-to guide's core recommendations include creating wind-resistant exterior envelopes for homes, better-connected roofing systems and a "unitized" home structure in which major components are well connected to other components from the roof all the way through the foundation. The guide--"What homeowners can do to make their homes stronger against high winds"--will be available through Clemson Extension offices and online at www.clemson.edu .

"We wanted to develop dirt-cheap things people could do to make their homes stronger and more wind resistant," said Clemson associate civil engineering professor Tim Reinhold. Clemson has one of the nation's top laboratories for testing the effects of wind on low-rise structures such as homes and schools.

Meanwhile, full-time coastal hazards specialist Elizabeth Judge will help homeowners, builders, architects and designers apply the lessons learned through cutting-edge research at Clemson and elsewhere. The agent, one of the few nationwide to specialize in hazards such as wind, earthquake and flood, is co-funded by the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium and Clemson's Cooperative Extension Service.

Ultimately, homeowners will be able to see wind solutions in action at 113 Calhoun Street, a 125-year-old house in Charleston that serves as a Community Sustainability Center to demonstrate how housing can be built to better survive the forces of nature while being kinder to the environment.

The 113 Calhoun Street Foundation, a partnership of the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service and the city of Charleston, will demonstrate how people can use off-the-shelf, economically feasible materials and techniques to make houses safer from natural disasters such as hurricanes.

The center, which will serve as the home office for Judge, is tentatively set to open in February.

The wood frame home survived Hurricane Hugo in 1989, many additional hurricanes, at least one fire and, in 1886, the most severe earthquake ever recorded east of the Mississippi.

That it's a survivor makes it an appropriate choice for a project designed to show builders, contractors and homeowners how to use construction techniques and materials to better protect a house from storm wind and consequent water damage, according to Bob Bacon, Sea Grant Extension program leader. Bacon heads the technical committee of architects, engineers and builders who are designing and executing 113 Calhoun's renovation and retrofit.

"This project is about protecting lives, property and the economy when natural disasters occur," he said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Clemson University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Clemson University. "Clemson Helps Homeowners Prepare For Future Hurricanes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 September 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990923071037.htm>.
Clemson University. (1999, September 23). Clemson Helps Homeowners Prepare For Future Hurricanes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990923071037.htm
Clemson University. "Clemson Helps Homeowners Prepare For Future Hurricanes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990923071037.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Scientists Find Invisible Space Shield Protecting Earth

Scientists Find Invisible Space Shield Protecting Earth

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — An invisible barrier is keeping dangerous super fast electrons from interfering with our atmosphere, but scientists aren't entirely sure how. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bolivian Recycling Initiative Turns Plastic Waste Into School Furniture

Bolivian Recycling Initiative Turns Plastic Waste Into School Furniture

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Innovative recycling project in La Paz separates city waste and converts plastic garbage into school furniture made from 'plastiwood'. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blu-Ray Discs Getting Second Run As Solar Panels

Blu-Ray Discs Getting Second Run As Solar Panels

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers at Northwestern University are repurposing Blu-ray movies for better solar panel technology thanks to the discs' internal structures. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Antarctic Sea Ice Mystery Thickens... Literally

Antarctic Sea Ice Mystery Thickens... Literally

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Antarctic sea ice isn't only expanding, it's thicker than previously thought, and scientists aren't sure exactly why. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins