Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Immune System Cells Surprisingly High in HIV-Infected Adolescents, Says Researcher At The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia

Date:
September 24, 1999
Source:
The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia
Summary:
Adolescents infected with HIV have a surprisingly high number of certain immune system cells. In studying 94 HIV-positive patients, aged 13 to 19, researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia found a "striking increase" in the number of circulating CD8 memory cells, which play a major role in attacking the AIDS virus.

Philadelphia — Adolescents infected with HIV were found to have a surprisingly high number of certain immune system cells, according to a research team led by an immunologist at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. In studying 94 HIV-positive patients, aged 13 to 19, the researchers found a "striking increase" in the number of circulating CD8 memory cells, which play a major role in attacking the virus that causes AIDS.

Related Articles


The study offers intriguing hints of how the immune system of adolescents differs from those of younger children and adults, according to the study’s lead author, Steven D. Douglas, M.D., Chief of Immunology at Children’s Hospital, and co-author Bret Rudy, M.D., of the same institution. Although adolescents represent the largest segment of the U.S. population newly infected with HIV, relatively little is known about the relative proportions of different blood cells in teenagers’ immune systems. The study, published in the September 1999 issue of the journal AIDS, is the first attempt to establish reference measurements for cells that act as immune system markers for both HIV-infected and healthy adolescents. At the time of the study, the infected teenagers had not been treated with the antiretroviral medicines commonly used against AIDS.

The researchers also found significant differences in immune system cell populations between male and female adolescents. These differences may be related to hormonal and developmental changes that occur during adolescence. Future studies will explore how the immune system of adolescents functions during HIV infection.

Blood samples were drawn from 243 HIV-positive and HIV-negative adolescents at 16 clinical sites throughout the United States participating in the Adolescent Medicine HIV/AIDS Research Network, established by the National Institutes of Health and the Health Resources and Services Administration. As part of that network, the REACH Project (Reaching for Excellence in Adolescent Care and Health) performs research and provides medical care for adolescents who are infected with HIV and those who are uninfected but at high risk for the infection because of their behavior and social situation.

The study was co-sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institute of Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Health Resources and Services Administration.

Addendum to reporters:One co-author of the study, Bret Rudy, M.D., also of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, is national co-chair of Project ACCESS, a social marketing campaign that will target the message, "HIV. Live with it. Get tested!" to at-risk young people in African-American and Latino communities in six cities: Baltimore, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, Philadelphia and Washington. Combining an advertising campaign with community-based events, the campaign will be launched on October 25. Project ACCESS is part of the Adolescent Medicine HIV/AIDS Research Network. More information on the campaign is available through the Department of Public Relations, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, through Maria Stearns, (215) 590-4091.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia. "Immune System Cells Surprisingly High in HIV-Infected Adolescents, Says Researcher At The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 September 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990923111353.htm>.
The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia. (1999, September 24). Immune System Cells Surprisingly High in HIV-Infected Adolescents, Says Researcher At The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990923111353.htm
The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia. "Immune System Cells Surprisingly High in HIV-Infected Adolescents, Says Researcher At The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990923111353.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Scientists in Amsterdam say couples transfer tens of millions of microbes when they kiss, encouraging healthy exposure to bacteria. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Cambridge scientists have unravelled the genetic code of a rare tapeworm that lived inside a patient's brain for at least four year. Researchers hope it will present new opportunities to diagnose and treat this invasive parasite. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins