Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Researchers Show An Experimental Solution For A Technologically Important 2-D Surface

Date:
May 10, 2000
Source:
University Of Arkansas
Summary:
Using the world’s strongest microscope to peer at atoms, University of Arkansas researchers have made discoveries about the surface of a two-dimensional crystal that will allow researchers to better understand and manipulate gallium arsenide (GaAs), a material commonly used in lasers for CD players, high-speed fiber-optic telecommunication equipment and transistors for cellular phones.

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Using the world’s strongest microscope to peer at atoms, University of Arkansas researchers have made discoveries about the surface of a two-dimensional crystal that will allow researchers to better understand and manipulate gallium arsenide (GaAs), a material commonly used in lasers for CD players, high-speed fiber-optic telecommunication equipment and transistors for cellular phones.

Related Articles


Paul Thibado, Vincent P. LaBella, D.W. Bullock, M. Anser, Z. Ding, C. Emery and Laurent Bellaiche, all of the physics department, found that the two-dimensional surface of the crystal forms a system predicted by the Ising model, a cornerstone in the field of many-body physics. They report their findings in today’s issue of Physical Review Letters.

"We have defined what governs atomic movement at the surface," Thibado said. "It’s a whole new way of looking at these systems."

Scientists make high-tech communications devices by depositing layers of atoms on top of this single crystal surface. To produce better devices, researchers need a fundamental understanding of the physics that governs the motion of atoms on that surface.

Thibado and LaBella’s group have for the first time looked at images of individual atoms on the surface of a crystal and charted their presence or absence as they form islands at high temperatures.

They found that the spontaneous formation of atomic islands follows the Ising model, which describes a large collection of objects interacting with their neighbors. Earnst Ising originally developed the model in 1926 to explain the spontaneous magnetization of magnetic materials as they are cooled from high temperatures. As a graduate student, Ising solved the model in one dimension.

About 20 years later Lars Onsager solved the Ising model in two dimensions, a solution considered to be one of the greatest theoretical achievements of the 20th century. The two-dimensional model is expressed in the GaAs system, according to the researchers.

LaBella illustrates the Ising model using a social phenomenon like the Pokemon craze: It came about by word-of-mouth, spreading from neighbor to neighbor. Last summer, Pokemon caught on like wildfire, and now everyone seems to know about it. The atoms on the crystal surface behave in the same way, going from a few atoms present on the surface to many in a flash, at a certain critical temperature.

By applying the Ising model to this surface, scientists can model the growth of a device and potentially become more efficient in creating useful materials.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Arkansas. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Arkansas. "Researchers Show An Experimental Solution For A Technologically Important 2-D Surface." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 May 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/05/000510065322.htm>.
University Of Arkansas. (2000, May 10). Researchers Show An Experimental Solution For A Technologically Important 2-D Surface. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/05/000510065322.htm
University Of Arkansas. "Researchers Show An Experimental Solution For A Technologically Important 2-D Surface." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/05/000510065322.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 18, 2014) The U.S. Navy unveils an underwater device that mimics the movement of a fish. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
3D Printed Cookies Just in Time for Christmas

3D Printed Cookies Just in Time for Christmas

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 18, 2014) A tech company in Spain have combined technology with cuisine to develop the 'Foodini', a 3D printer designed to print the perfect cookie for Santa. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ford Expands Air Bag Recall Nationwide

Ford Expands Air Bag Recall Nationwide

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) The automaker added 447,000 vehicles to its recall list, bringing the total to more than 502,000. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Sony Hopes To Make Any Glasses 'Smart'

How Sony Hopes To Make Any Glasses 'Smart'

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Sony's glasses module attaches to the temples of various eye- and sunglasses to add a display and wireless connectivity. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins