Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Novel Compound Inhibits HIV Replication In Cell Cultures, Suggesting Possible New Type Of AIDS Drug

Date:
March 29, 2001
Source:
Childrens Hospital Of Philadelphia
Summary:
A compound that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in human immune system cells may eventually provide a new therapeutic approach against AIDS by blocking HIV infection at an early stage. It may also deny the virus a hiding place in the cells from which HIV infection commonly rebounds when current AIDS medications are interrupted

Philadelphia, Pa. — A compound that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in human immune system cells may eventually provide a new therapeutic approach against AIDS by blocking HIV infection at an early stage. It may also deny the virus a hiding place in the cells from which HIV infection commonly rebounds when current AIDS medications are interrupted.

A research team led by pediatric immunologists at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia announced its results in the March 27 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The research, by Steven D. Douglas, M.D., Jian-Ping Lai, M.D., and Wen-Zhe Ho, M.D., was carried out in human cell cultures.

The compound, CP-96,345, binds to receptors on the surface of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), which are immune system cells. These macrophages play an important role in HIV infection because they are a reservoir for the virus. HIV infection remains latent in these cells even while the anti-HIV drug cocktail, highly active antitretroviral therapy, controls the active infection. If the drug cocktail is halted, HIV infection surges back.

"This compound is potentially a very powerful therapy because it may close the door to the virus," said Dr. Douglas, the chief of Immunology at Children’s Hospital and lead author of the article. CP-96,345 interrupts the process by which particular strains of HIV, the R5 strains, enter macrophages through receptors on the macrophage’s cell surface. Many AIDS researchers are targeting those specific receptors, CCR5 receptors, as a way to block HIV infection in its early stages.

Crucial to the action of CP-96,345 is a naturally produced protein called substance P. First discovered in 1930, substance P is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that carries signals within the brain and elsewhere in the nervous system. Known to be an active transmitter of pain signals, substance P also plays an important role, still under investigation, in the immune system. In 1997, Drs. Douglas, Ho and Lai showed that macrophages and other immune system cells produce substance P. Their other studies found that increased levels of substance P were associated with higher levels of stress and anxiety. "Substance P provides a method by which the central nervous system interacts with the immune system," said Dr. Douglas.

The Children’s Hospital team previously showed that substance P raised HIV levels in macrophage cell cultures. Therefore, they designed the current HIV experiment using a substance P antagonist – a chemical that interferes with substance P and its interaction with its receptor. That antagonist, CP-96,345, blocks the binding between substance P and receptors for substance P on the surface of MDMs. Still to be explained is how the interaction between substance P and its receptor on the macrophages affects the CCR5 receptor that allows HIV to infect those cells.

The researchers will continue to study the immunological activities of substance P and its corresponding antagonists. Because substance P is found in both the immune system and the nervous system, one future area of research is to determine whether CP-96,345 might block AIDS-induced dementia and other neurological damage caused by HIV.

Founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia is ranked today as the best pediatric hospital in the nation by a comprehensive Child Magazine survey. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country, ranking second in National Institutes of Health funding.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Childrens Hospital Of Philadelphia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Childrens Hospital Of Philadelphia. "Novel Compound Inhibits HIV Replication In Cell Cultures, Suggesting Possible New Type Of AIDS Drug." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 March 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/03/010327081022.htm>.
Childrens Hospital Of Philadelphia. (2001, March 29). Novel Compound Inhibits HIV Replication In Cell Cultures, Suggesting Possible New Type Of AIDS Drug. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/03/010327081022.htm
Childrens Hospital Of Philadelphia. "Novel Compound Inhibits HIV Replication In Cell Cultures, Suggesting Possible New Type Of AIDS Drug." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/03/010327081022.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

At Least 20 Chikungunya Cases in New Jersey

AP (July 30, 2014) At least 20 New Jersey residents have tested positive for chikungunya, a mosquito-borne virus that has spread through the Caribbean. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Xtreme Eating: Your Daily Caloric Intake All On One Plate

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Center for Science in the Public Interest released its 2014 list of single meals with whopping calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins