Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Discovery Offers Hope Of Better Treatments For Cocaine Addiction Relapse

Date:
May 15, 2001
Source:
Albert Einstein College Of Medicine
Summary:
Researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine have identified a key mechanism involved in relapse to cocaine addiction. In determining the involvement of the neurotransmitter glutamate in relapse in the rat, the Einstein researchers also suggest a promising target for developing effective treatments for preventing relapses.

Researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine have identified a key mechanism involved in relapse to cocaine addiction. In determining the involvement of the neurotransmitter glutamate in relapse in the rat, the Einstein researchers also suggest a promising target for developing effective treatments for preventing relapses. They report their findings in the May 11 issue of Science.

"We stimulated a region of the brain that contains the neurotransmitter glutamate and were able to cause relapse," explains Dr. Stanislav R. Vorel, first author of the study that he and his Einstein colleagues conducted in conjunction with Dr. Eliot Gardner of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, a unit of the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

The study explored the effects of electrical stimulation of the hippocampus region of the brain, which is one of the regions associated with memory.

"We found that electrical stimulation of the hippocampus, a memory area that may underlie the memory of drug effects, led to drug-seeking behavior," says Dr. Vorel, who is a graduate student at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Vorel previously received his M.D. degree in the Netherlands.

Further, the researchers were able to demonstrate that a glutamate blocker (kynurenic acid) blocks relapse, suggesting to them that glutamate blockers could be good ingredients for developing new addiction treatments.

"Previous drug development has focused on the neurotransmitter dopamine, which is connected to the 'liking' region of the brain, rather than the 'wanting' response we observed in the hippocampus," says Dr. Vorel. "Since 'wanting' a drug is more directly connected to relapse - which is the greatest hindrance to successful addiction treatment - we believe glutamate could prove a promising target for new drug developments designed to treat cocaine addiction."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Albert Einstein College Of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Albert Einstein College Of Medicine. "New Discovery Offers Hope Of Better Treatments For Cocaine Addiction Relapse." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 May 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/010511073954.htm>.
Albert Einstein College Of Medicine. (2001, May 15). New Discovery Offers Hope Of Better Treatments For Cocaine Addiction Relapse. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/010511073954.htm
Albert Einstein College Of Medicine. "New Discovery Offers Hope Of Better Treatments For Cocaine Addiction Relapse." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/010511073954.htm (accessed August 28, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Alice in Wonderland Syndrome

Alice in Wonderland Syndrome

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) It’s an unusual condition with a colorful name. Kids with “Alice in Wonderland” syndrome see sudden distortions in objects they’re looking at or their own bodies appear to change size, a lot like the main character in the Lewis Carroll story. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stopping Schizophrenia Before Birth

Stopping Schizophrenia Before Birth

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Scientists have long called choline a “brain booster” essential for human development. Not only does it aid in memory and learning, researchers now believe choline could help prevent mental illness. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Personalized Brain Vaccine for Glioblastoma

Personalized Brain Vaccine for Glioblastoma

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive brain cancer in humans. Now a new treatment using the patient’s own tumor could help slow down its progression and help patients live longer. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Brain Surgery in 3-D

Brain Surgery in 3-D

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Neurosurgeons now have a new approach to brain surgery using the same 3D glasses you’d put on at an IMAX movie theater. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins