Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Find New Approach To Developing Medications To Prevent Relapse To Cocaine Use

Date:
October 3, 2001
Source:
NIH/National Institute On Drug Abuse
Summary:
Research teams from the Drug Abuse Program of the VU Medical Center in the Netherlands and the intramural laboratories of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) have identified a process in the brain that may lead to a new generation of medications to prevent relapse to cocaine use.

Research teams from the Drug Abuse Program of the VU Medical Center in the Netherlands and the intramural laboratories of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) have identified a process in the brain that may lead to a new generation of medications to prevent relapse to cocaine use.

In studies using rats, the scientists, led by Dr. Taco J. De Vries of VU Medical Center and Dr. Yavin Shaham of NIDA, found that the same system–the cannabinoid system–that governs the pharmacological actions of marijuana in the brain also plays an important role in the neuronal processes underlying relapse to cocaine use.

By blocking cannabinoid receptor activity with chemical antagonists, the investigators prevented relapse to cocaine use induced by exposure to cocaine-associated cues or by cocaine itself.

NIDA Director Dr. Alan I. Leshner says, “This finding could open up a new avenue for the development of drugs to prevent relapse to cocaine use induced by environmental cues.

Treatment of cocaine addiction has always been hampered by high rates of relapse, even after prolonged drug abstinence, and this research could be the first step in the development of a new medicinal approach to make it easier for a recovering addict to remain drug-free.”

Dr. De Vries of the Dutch research team says that findings from this and other experiments indicate that the CB1 cannabinoid receptor is a promising target for a pharmacological intervention to prevent relapse to cocaine seeking.

In this study, according to Dr. De Vries, the CB1 receptor antagonist, SR141716A, administered to the rats reduced relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior in two of the three most common conditions associated with relapse: exposure to stimuli or environmental cues previously associated with cocaine use and exposure to cocaine itself. It had no effect on relapse triggered by stress.

The study is published in the October 1 issue of Nature-Medicine.

###

The National Institute on Drug Abuse is a component of the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIDA supports more than 85 percent of the world's research on the health aspects of drug abuse and addiction.

The Institute carries out a large variety of programs to ensure the rapid dissemination of research information and its implementation in policy and practice. Fact sheets on the health effects of drugs of abuse and other topics can be ordered free of charge in English and Spanish through NIDA Infofax at 1-888-NIH-NIDA (644-6432) or 1-888-TTY-NIDA (889-6432) for the deaf. These fact sheets and further information on NIDA research and other activities can be found on the NIDA home page at http://www.drugabuse.gov


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NIH/National Institute On Drug Abuse. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute On Drug Abuse. "Scientists Find New Approach To Developing Medications To Prevent Relapse To Cocaine Use." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 October 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/10/011003064621.htm>.
NIH/National Institute On Drug Abuse. (2001, October 3). Scientists Find New Approach To Developing Medications To Prevent Relapse To Cocaine Use. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/10/011003064621.htm
NIH/National Institute On Drug Abuse. "Scientists Find New Approach To Developing Medications To Prevent Relapse To Cocaine Use." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/10/011003064621.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) The World Health Organization has declared Nigeria free of Ebola. Health experts credit a bit of luck and the government's initial response. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) An ingredient in erectile-dysfunction medications such as Viagra could improve heart function. Perhaps not surprising, given Viagra's history. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 20, 2014) Forty-three people who had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S., were cleared overnight of twice-daily monitoring after 21 days of showing no symptoms. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Calls for New Ebola Safety Guidelines

CDC Calls for New Ebola Safety Guidelines

AP (Oct. 20, 2014) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden laid out new guidelines for health care workers when dealing with the deadly Ebola virus including new precautions when taking off personal protective equipment. (Oct. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins