Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Dual Action Drug Fights Heart Failure

Date:
July 30, 2002
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
A dual-action drug, called omapatrilat, was found to be as good as a standard ACE-inhibitor in reducing the risk of death and hospitalization from heart failure, according to a report in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

DALLAS, July 30 – A dual-action drug, called omapatrilat, was found to be as good as a standard ACE-inhibitor in reducing the risk of death and hospitalization from heart failure, according to a report in today's rapid track Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Related Articles


"The trial shows that omapatrilat is effective in treating heart failure," says lead researcher Milton Packer, M.D., of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. "And we have some indications that omapatrilat may be superior to a standard ACE inhibitor in some individuals. Our data suggests that this drug may have a special role in treating people who have both high blood pressure and heart failure."

Researchers analyzed the effects of the drug omapatrilat, which blocks both angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and neutral endopeptidase (NEP). In people with high blood pressure, omapatrilat was better than ACE inhibitors alone in lowering blood pressure. They hypothesized that the drug could also be better than an ACE inhibitor in patients with heart failure because it not only blocks ACE but also blocks NEP – one of the enzymes responsible for breaking down peptides that benefit heart function. In animal studies, simultaneous inhibition of both ACE and NEP produced greater benefits than did ACE inhibition alone.

The trial [called the Omapatrilat Vs. Enalapril Randomized Trial of Utility in Reducing Events (OVERTURE) trial] compared omapatrilat with enalapril, a standard ACE inhibitor. The trial enrolled 5770 patients with heart failure at 704 institutions in 42 countries. Participants had heart failure for more than two months, had left ventricular ejection fraction of 30 percent or less and had been hospitalized for heart failure within the previous year. They were randomly assigned: 2886 to the omapatrilat group and 2884 to the enalapril group. The average age of each group was about 63 years, and about 80 percent of the two groups were men. Patients were evaluated on an outpatient basis every one to four months for an average of 14.5 months.

In the omapatrilat group, 914 patients died or were hospitalized for heart failure serious enough to require intravenous treatment, compared to 973 of those in the enalapril group. This was a 6 percent difference – a result that showed that omapatrilat was effective but not more effective than enalapril. However, further analysis, using a broader definition of heart failure or focusing on all cardiovascular events, suggested that omapatrilat may have been superior to enalapril. Patients who had both hypertension and heart failure showed the greatest advantage of omapatrilat when compared with enalapril. These findings in the post hoc analysis warrant further study, he says.

Both drugs were well tolerated in the study. Patients in the omapatrilat group were more likely to experience dizziness and low blood pressure, whereas patients in the enalapril group were more likely to experience worsening heart function and worsening renal function. Angioedema, a swelling of the head and neck which can rarely be serious enough to cause breathing difficulties, occurred rarely in both groups and was never serious.

"Angioedema has been an important concern when omapatrilat was tested in patients without heart failure, but fortunately, patients with heart failure seem to be resistant to this potential side effect of the drug. This was a very gratifying finding."

Co-authors of the study include: Robert M. Califf, M.D., Marvin A. Konstam, M.D., Henry Krum, MBBS, Ph.D.; John J. McMurray, M.D.; Jean-Lucien Rouleau, M.D.; and Karl Swedberg, M.D., for the OVERTURE Study Group.

The study was funded by Bristol Myers Squibb.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "Dual Action Drug Fights Heart Failure." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 July 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/07/020730075713.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2002, July 30). Dual Action Drug Fights Heart Failure. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/07/020730075713.htm
American Heart Association. "Dual Action Drug Fights Heart Failure." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/07/020730075713.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Can fat disappear into thin air? New research finds that during weight loss, over 80 percent of a person's fat molecules escape through the lungs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) According to research out of the University of Pennsylvania, waking up for work is the biggest factor that causes Americans to lose sleep. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

AP (Dec. 17, 2014) A wave of flu illnesses has forced some Ohio schools to shut down over the past week. State officials confirmed one pediatric flu-related death, a 15-year-old girl in southern Ohio. (Dec. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins