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Controlling 'Badly' Behaving Neurons May Ease Parkinson's Disease

Date:
March 14, 2003
Source:
Northwestern University
Summary:
Blocking or eliminating a specific potassium channel in a small group of brain cells may improve or prevent the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, a debilitating and progressive neurodegenerative disease that afflicts over 1 million people in the United States.

Blocking or eliminating a specific potassium channel in a small group of brain cells may improve or prevent the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, a debilitating and progressive neurodegenerative disease that afflicts over 1 million people in the United States.

In Parkinson's disease, neurons that release dopamine die. The loss of dopamine causes an array of debilitating symptoms that include resting tremor, muscle rigidity and slowed movement.

Although the cause of the disease remains uncertain, James Surmeier and colleagues at Northwestern University have discovered a way of potentially lessening the symptoms and progression of the disease. The investigators describe their findings in the March issue of Nature Neuroscience.

Surmeier, who is Nathan Smith Davis Professor and chair of physiology at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, and his co-researchers found that the "bad" behavior of neurons responsible for the symptoms of Parkinson's disease is controlled by a potassium channel that is almost unique to the affected brain regions.

This potassium channel – referred to as Kv3.4 – is found in only small subsets of neurons outside the basal ganglia. Neurons of the subthalamic nucleus are enriched in this channel, making them capable of the "bad" activity patterns found in Parkinson's disease patients.

Surgically destroying these neurons or inserting a stimulating electrode in the brain to disrupt the neurons' "bad" activity provides symptomatic relief in late-stage Parkinson's patients. Unfortunately, these strategies can cause unwanted side effects, including uncontrolled movement.

"The perfect therapy for Parkinson's disease would be to prevent neurons from exhibiting the behavior that causes the symptoms of the disease without altering their 'good' behaviors," Surmeier said.

"Current strategies don't distinguish between these two modes of activity. It is also possible that the 'bad' behavior or these neurons contributes to the progression of the disease, which may not be ameliorated by deep-brain stimulation strategies that are being used today," Surmeier said.

The findings from his group's current study suggest that it is possible to stop high-frequency spiking in these neurons by blocking potassium channels with the Kv3.4 subunit or by eliminating the subunit using gene therapy techniques.

"Doing so will eliminate the 'bad' behavior but, importantly, preserve the 'good' behavior – normal regular spiking – of these neurons," he said.

Surmeier also said that it is possible the high-frequency burst of spikes in subthalamic neurons is responsible for Parkinson's disease itself, so that correcting this behavior will stop the disease in its tracks – the focus of his group's ongoing research at the Feinberg School.

The study was funded by a grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health. Surmeier received a Jacob Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award from the NINDS to pursue this research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Northwestern University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Northwestern University. "Controlling 'Badly' Behaving Neurons May Ease Parkinson's Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 March 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/03/030314071813.htm>.
Northwestern University. (2003, March 14). Controlling 'Badly' Behaving Neurons May Ease Parkinson's Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/03/030314071813.htm
Northwestern University. "Controlling 'Badly' Behaving Neurons May Ease Parkinson's Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/03/030314071813.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

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