Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

By 2020, 76 Million Worldwide Could Go Blind Without Prevention; Vision 2020 Initiative Could Cut Figure By Nearly Two-thirds

Date:
March 31, 2003
Source:
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School Of Public Health
Summary:
Over 52 million people worldwide can avoid going blind if current and new resources are successfully implemented, according to a new study. Researchers for the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine found that without extra intervention, the global number of blind individuals would increase from 44 million in 2000 to 76 million in 2020.

Over 52 million people worldwide can avoid going blind if current and new resources are successfully implemented, according to a new study. Researchers for the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine found that without extra intervention, the global number of blind individuals would increase from 44 million in 2000 to 76 million in 2020.

Related Articles


"Vision 2020 - The Right to Sight," an initiative cosponsored by the World Health Organization and the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness, is aimed at eliminating avoidable blindness from cataract, trachoma, onchocerciasis, vitamin A deficiency and refractive errors, would decrease the 2020 projection by 52 million individuals. The economic gain of this program would be approximately $102 billion. The study, "The Magnitude and Cost of Global Blindness: An Increasing Problem That Can Be Alleviated," will appear in the April 2003 issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

Researchers used existing data and epidemiologic models to estimate blindness prevalence, and combined these and other data on national populations, gross domestic product per capita, labor force participation and unemployment rates to project the economic productivity loss associated with blindness. The global loss could grow from $42 billion to $110 billion if efforts to decrease vision loss do not change.

Kevin D. Frick, PhD, lead author of the study and associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management in the School, said, "The economic costs of blindness can be decreased by either finding ways to facilitate economic productivity of individuals who are or will become blind or eliminating avoidable blindness. VISION 2020 is an initiative aimed at the latter goal. If VISION 2020 were to be successful at decreasing the prevalence of blindness in all regions of the world to near the levels that are found in the established market economies today, a conservative estimate of the economic gain from increased productivity is $102 billion."

Dr. Frick and his co-author projected that the aging and growth of the global population over the next 20 years will lead to a large increase in the number of blind persons. The researchers state that this increase could be avoided by using existing and new resources at the causes of blindness for which proven interventions are available, such as cataract surgery.

Dr. Frick said, "Blindness and low vision are public health problems that will increase because of demographic trends unless there are additional interventions. If successful, VISION 2020 will reduce avoidable blindness by 429 million blind person-years and a minimum saving of $102 billion for unaccommodated blindness along from 2003 to 2020."

Allen Foster, FRCS, FRCOphth, Medical Director of Christoffel-Blindenmission through the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, co-authored the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School Of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School Of Public Health. "By 2020, 76 Million Worldwide Could Go Blind Without Prevention; Vision 2020 Initiative Could Cut Figure By Nearly Two-thirds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 March 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/03/030331043944.htm>.
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School Of Public Health. (2003, March 31). By 2020, 76 Million Worldwide Could Go Blind Without Prevention; Vision 2020 Initiative Could Cut Figure By Nearly Two-thirds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/03/030331043944.htm
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School Of Public Health. "By 2020, 76 Million Worldwide Could Go Blind Without Prevention; Vision 2020 Initiative Could Cut Figure By Nearly Two-thirds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/03/030331043944.htm (accessed December 17, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Can fat disappear into thin air? New research finds that during weight loss, over 80 percent of a person's fat molecules escape through the lungs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

AP (Dec. 17, 2014) A wave of flu illnesses has forced some Ohio schools to shut down over the past week. State officials confirmed one pediatric flu-related death, a 15-year-old girl in southern Ohio. (Dec. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Yoga Could Be As Beneficial For The Heart As Walking, Biking

Yoga Could Be As Beneficial For The Heart As Walking, Biking

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Yoga can help your weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and heart just as much as biking and walking does, a new study suggests. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins