Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

'Lost' Protein May Lead To New Prostate Cancer Treatment

Date:
June 10, 2003
Source:
Northwestern University
Summary:
Northwestern University researchers have found that a protein normally made in the body is critical for normal prostate growth regulation because mice that lack this protein develop an enlarged prostate. The excessive prostate growth in these animals resembles the human disease benign prostatic hyperplasia.

Northwestern University researchers have found that a protein normally made in the body is critical for normal prostate growth regulation because mice that lack this protein develop an enlarged prostate. The excessive prostate growth in these animals resembles the human disease benign prostatic hyperplasia. In an article published in the June issue of Nature Medicine, lead authors Jennifer Doll and Veronica Stellmach, with their colleagues at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago and Umea University in Sweden, presented their studies of a protein called pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF).

The observation of too many cells in the prostate of the PEDF-null mice led the researchers to examine PEDF in human prostates and prostate cancers, as well as in cells cultured from these tissues.

PEDF was easily detected in healthy prostate tissue and normal prostate cells, but little to no PEDF was detected in most of the prostate cancer tissue samples examined or in isolated prostate cancer cells grown in the lab.

Androgens, the male sex hormones that regulate prostate growth, were shown to inhibit the production of PEDF. Because androgen ablation (removal) therapy is an important part of prostate cancer treatment, the researchers measured PEDF production following androgen ablation in prostate cancer cells. They found that PEDF production appeared to be turned back on in the cells of these tumors.

One important role recently defined for PEDF was its potent activity as an inhibitor of angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, which is required for tumor growth. To determine if PEDF may be affecting cells in a tumor in addition to the cells lining the blood vessels, the researchers examined the effects of purified PEDF on cultured prostate cancer cells. They found that PEDF triggered an increased rate of prostate cancer cell death, and that this effect was enhanced if the cells were oxygen deprived, which occurs in growing tumors.

The anti-tumor action of PEDF was confirmed when treatment of prostate tumors in mice with PEDF resulted in tumor cell death.

Doll is a research associate and Stellmach a research assistant professor of pathology at the Feinberg School. Their co-researchers at the Feinberg School were Noel P. Bouck, emeritus professor of microbiology-immunology and a researcher at The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Chung Lee, John T. Grayhack Professor of Urology Research and Cancer Center researcher; Lisa P. Abramson; Mona L. Cornwell; Michael R. Pins, associate professor of pathology; Jayme Borensztan-Brentan, Floyd Elroy Patterson Research Professor of Pathology; and Susan E. Crawford, associate professor of pathology and Cancer Center researcher. Anders R.J. Bergh, Umea University, Umea, Sweden, also contributed to these studies.

This research was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Northwestern University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Northwestern University. "'Lost' Protein May Lead To New Prostate Cancer Treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 June 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/06/030610075048.htm>.
Northwestern University. (2003, June 10). 'Lost' Protein May Lead To New Prostate Cancer Treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/06/030610075048.htm
Northwestern University. "'Lost' Protein May Lead To New Prostate Cancer Treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/06/030610075048.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins