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A Pill-Free Route To Better Sleep For Elderly

Date:
January 19, 2004
Source:
University Of Oxford
Summary:
Elderly people suffering from insomnia may be better advised to seek help from cognitive behavioural therapy than sleeping pills, according to new research.

Elderly people suffering from insomnia may be better advised to seek help from cognitive behavioural therapy than sleeping pills, according to research published Oxford and Bristol on Monday, 19 January 2004.

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The team systematically examined scientific evidence to assess the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural treatments for insomnia for the over 60 year olds. Such treatment aims to improve sleep by changing poor sleeping habits and challenging negative thoughts, attitudes or beliefs about sleep. The researchers found that studies which were carried out in the most scientifically rigorous manner consistently reported improvements in maintaining good sleep for those who had cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).

CBT to improve sleep includes teaching people good sleep habits, for example making sure that people reduce their caffeine intake after 4pm and that they prepare for rest properly in a number of ways. Another approach might be practicing some muscle relaxation skills, or getting people to have less sleep for a while and then gradually expanding it so that patients fall asleep more quickly. Helping people overcome their anxiety often associated with insomnia is another intervention that has been shown to be helpful.

Dr Paul Montgomery, Lecturer and Researcher at the Department of Social Policy and Social Work at Oxford University, said: ‘Older people are often prescribed a range of drugs for their health problems, many of which have side effects. Such side effects are just one reason why there is an argument to be made for clinical use of non-pharmacological treatments. Further research into which elements of cognitive behavioural therapy are most useful is needed. To increase the long-term effect, it may be necessary to do ‘top-up’ sessions at regular intervals. Cognitive behavioural therapy may also be useful in preventive education for sleep disorders.’

Notes to editors:

These findings are published by Paul Montgomery and Jane Dennis, 2004, ‘A systematic review of non-pharmacological therapies for sleep problems in later life’, Sleep Medicine Review, Volume 8 Issue 1, pp 47–62.

Between 12 and 40 per cent of people aged 65 and over suffer from sleep problems including difficulties falling asleep and maintaining sleep, as well as early morning waking with an inability to return to sleep. Such chronic sleep disturbance affects their quality of life in a number of ways as mood, energy and general performance during waking hours are lowered.

It is estimated that fewer than 15 percent of patients with chronic insomnia receive treatment, with the most common treatment being pharmacological. This is undesirable because the effect of sleeping pills may still be felt by elderly people during the day, and risks of conditions such as constipation or falls and fractures, to which an ageing population is already prone, are increased.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Oxford. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Oxford. "A Pill-Free Route To Better Sleep For Elderly." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 January 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040119083638.htm>.
University Of Oxford. (2004, January 19). A Pill-Free Route To Better Sleep For Elderly. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040119083638.htm
University Of Oxford. "A Pill-Free Route To Better Sleep For Elderly." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040119083638.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

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