Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Manual Techniques May Ease Tough Deliveries Without Need For Episiotomy

Date:
February 12, 2004
Source:
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Summary:
In the rare but serious case of shoulder dystocia, in which an infant's shoulders get stuck in the birth canal after its head emerges, mother and baby might fare better if doctors use their hands to manipulate the baby's position to ease delivery than if they cut perineal tissue to widen the opening, a Johns Hopkins study suggests.

In the rare but serious case of shoulder dystocia, in which an infant's shoulders get stuck in the birth canal after its head emerges, mother and baby might fare better if doctors use their hands to manipulate the baby's position to ease delivery than if they cut perineal tissue to widen the opening, a Johns Hopkins study suggests.

Related Articles


"Shoulder dystocia is a problem of fit," says lead author Edith Gurewitsch, M.D., assistant professor of gynecology/obstetrics. "It is an issue of bony disproportion or misalignment between the mother's pelvic bones and the infant's bony shoulders, so cutting the soft tissue is controversial. If manual techniques alone can be used to deliver the baby, the mother can be spared a significant perineal injury and there might even be fewer complications for the infant after delivery."

Shoulder dystocia occurs in about 5 percent of births, Gurewitsch estimates, and up to a quarter of these deliveries can result in an injury to the baby's brachial plexus, the nerves that control movement and sensation in the arm. Up to 10 percent of infants who sustain such an injury can wind up with permanent damage.

Gurewitsch and colleagues compared the outcomes of more severe "stuck shoulder" births at Hopkins during deliveries between 1993 and 2003, and evaluated records from legal cases nationwide in which babies sustained permanent brachial plexus damage. They compared outcomes for both mother and baby when physicians used either episiotomies (cutting a wider opening) without manual techniques or manual techniques without episiotomy to finish delivering the baby.

Of the 40 episiotomy cases, 24 babies had permanent brachial plexus damage, 12 had poor Apgar scores at birth and 20 of the mothers had severe perineal injuries involving the anal sphincter muscle. Of the 38 cases where manual techniques were employed, 15 babies had permanent brachial plexus damage, and six had poor Apgar scores at birth but only one mother had a severe perineal injury.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "Manual Techniques May Ease Tough Deliveries Without Need For Episiotomy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/02/040212083754.htm>.
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. (2004, February 12). Manual Techniques May Ease Tough Deliveries Without Need For Episiotomy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/02/040212083754.htm
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "Manual Techniques May Ease Tough Deliveries Without Need For Episiotomy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/02/040212083754.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — One man hopes his invention -– a machine that produces cheap sanitary pads –- will help empower Indian women. Duration: 01:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

Newsy (Nov. 28, 2014) — WHO cites four studies that say Ebola can still be detected in semen up to 82 days after the onset of symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins