Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mechanism Found That 'Protects' Aggressive Melanoma From Angiogenesis Inhibitors

Date:
October 13, 2004
Source:
Northwestern University
Summary:
Northwestern University researchers have discovered a mechanism that may help to explain how angiogenesis inhibitors work on normal, blood vessel-forming endothelial cells, but not on insidious, aggressive melanoma cells that masquerade as endothelial-like cells by forming their own vascular networks, called "vasculogenic mimicry."

Northwestern University researchers have discovered a mechanism that may help to explain how angiogenesis inhibitors work on normal, blood vessel-forming endothelial cells, but not on insidious, aggressive melanoma cells that masquerade as endothelial-like cells by forming their own vascular networks, called "vasculogenic mimicry."

Related Articles


Mary J. C. Hendrix, professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and president and scientific director of the Children's Memorial Research Center, led the study, results of which were published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Hendrix and her laboratory team are also members of The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University.

Hendrix and colleagues found that endostatin and two other angiogenesis inhibitors, which prevent new blood vessel growth that supports the spread of cancerous tumors, were effective in blocking endothelial cell formation of vascular networks, but were unable to prevent vascular networks formed by melanoma cells.

Further experiments showed that endothelial cells have more endostatin receptors than melanoma cells, suggesting a mechanistic basis for the differential response of the two cell types to angiogenesis inhibitors.

Findings from the study may contribute to the development of new cancer therapies that target both angiogenesis and tumor cell vasculogenic mimicry.

Moreover, because vasculogenic mimicry has been reported in several other tumor types, including breast, prostatic, ovarian and lung cancer, these findings may offer new insights for designing rational antivascular therapies in other forms of cancer, Hendrix said.

In the past decade, many new angiogenesis inhibitors have been identified, and several have been shown effective against tumor growth in laboratory experiments. However, results of early clinical trials with these inhibitors have not yet paralleled the success achieved in animal models.

In their recent experiments, Hendrix and co-researchers examined effects of three angiogenesis inhibitors with different specificities (anginex, TNP-470, and endostatin) on vasculogenic mimicry in human melanoma cells and compared the results with effects on human endothelial cells.

Endothelial cell growth and migration were markedly inhibited by anginex, TNP-470 and endostatin, while the melanoma cells were relatively unaffected.

The scientists subsequently investigated whether endothelial cells and melanoma cells expressed different levels of two newly discovered receptors (alpha 5 beta 1 integrin and heparin sulfate proteoglycan 2) for the angiogenesis inhibitor endostatin.

Results showed that endothelial cells have significantly higher levels of these receptors.

"The differential response of endothelial cells and melanoma cells to angiogenesis inhibitors in our study may provide additional clues about the mechanistic interactions between endothelia and proliferating tumors and suggest additional targets for antivascular and antiangiogenic drug therapy," Hendrix said.

Hendrix's co-researchers on this study were: Richard E. B. Seftor; Elizabeth A. Seftor; Angela R. Hess; Lynn M. Gruman; and Dawn A. Kirschmann, Children's Memorial Research Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University. Daisy W.J. van der Schaft, and Arjan W. Griffioen are affiliated with the Research Institute for Growth and Development, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Yumi Yokoyama is with the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Northwestern University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Northwestern University. "Mechanism Found That 'Protects' Aggressive Melanoma From Angiogenesis Inhibitors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 October 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041008024837.htm>.
Northwestern University. (2004, October 13). Mechanism Found That 'Protects' Aggressive Melanoma From Angiogenesis Inhibitors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041008024837.htm
Northwestern University. "Mechanism Found That 'Protects' Aggressive Melanoma From Angiogenesis Inhibitors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041008024837.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — One man hopes his invention -– a machine that produces cheap sanitary pads –- will help empower Indian women. Duration: 01:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

Newsy (Nov. 28, 2014) — WHO cites four studies that say Ebola can still be detected in semen up to 82 days after the onset of symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins