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Potential For Developing A New Cream Or Gel To Block AIDS Transmission During Heterosexual Sex

Date:
October 20, 2004
Source:
Case Western Reserve University
Summary:
Michael Lederman, M.D., of Case Western Reserve University (Case) School of Medicine and University Hospitals of Cleveland (UH), and research colleagues have shown that it may be possible to block male to female HIV transmission in heterosexual intercourse and have identified the target for blocking that transmission, according to an article from the Oct. 14 issue of Science.

Michael Lederman, M.D., of Case Western Reserve University (Case) School of Medicine and University Hospitals of Cleveland (UH), and research colleagues have shown that it may be possible to block male to female HIV transmission in heterosexual intercourse and have identified the target for blocking that transmission, according to an article from the Oct. 14 issue of Science.

“Effective methods for blocking the transmission of HIV are urgently needed,” said Lederman, M.D., the Scott R. Inkley Professor of Medicine and director of the Center for AIDS Research at Case and UH, and lead author on the paper. “Our study focuses on a strategy for preventing transmission of HIV through the vagina. We have identified a potential target, a mechanism critical for the transmission at vaginal sites of infection, that may offer a simple strategy for preventing HIV transmission.”

“The vast majority of HIV infections in the world are sexually transmitted, most commonly through heterosexual sex,” Lederman said. “But there has been substantial debate as to how the virus actually gets into cells at these sites of transmission, called mucosal sites. HIV can use certain cell surface molecules such as CCR5 to gain entry into cells. We knew that people with a mutation whose CD4 cells’ surface lack CCR5 are almost completely protected from acquiring HIV infection. But HIV can also use other target molecules to get into other cells. Thus there was some uncertainty as to how HIV was transmitted at mucosal sites and therefore which pathways needed to be blocked in order to prevent HIV transmission there. We decided to test the hypothesis that blocking CCR5 alone would be sufficient to protect rhesus macaques from vaginal challenge with a virus like HIV. A natural immune messenger (chemokine) called RANTES can bind to CCR5 and by binding, forces the cell to internalize the CCR5 receptor so HIV cannot bind to it. We developed an altered RANTES molecule that is even more effective than RANTES at targeting CCR5 and making it unavailable to the virus.”

In their experiment, Lederman and his colleagues applied a highly concentrated solution containing the altered chemokine to the vaginal membranes of rhesus macaque monkeys and challenged them with high doses of a virus that combined the outer surface of HIV and the inner workings of SIV—so called SHIV. The solution was successful in protecting the macaques without any detectable side effects.

“There is still a lot of work to be done before we have an affordable, easy to use method of blocking transmission of HIV through the vaginal membranes,” Lederman said. “But we have taken an important step. Now that we have shown that it is possible to block SHIV transmission through the vagina in macaques and have identified the target molecule for blocking that transmission, the door is open to the development of a topical agent that could prevent infection with HIV in humans.”

Other authors on the paper who contributed equally with Lederman are Ronald S. Veazey of the Tulane National Primate Research Center and Robin Offord of the Department of Structural Biology and Bioinformatics Faculty of Medicine at the University of Geneva.

About Case Western Reserve University

Case is among the nation's leading research institutions. Founded in 1826 and shaped by the unique merger of the Case Institute of Technology and Western Reserve University, Case is distinguished by its strengths in education, research, service, and experiential learning. Located in Cleveland, Case offers nationally recognized programs in the Arts and Sciences, Dental Medicine, Engineering, Law, Management, Medicine, Nursing, and Social Sciences. The Commission on Presidential Debates selected Case to host the U.S. vice presidential debate on October 5, 2004. http://www.case.edu.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Case Western Reserve University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Case Western Reserve University. "Potential For Developing A New Cream Or Gel To Block AIDS Transmission During Heterosexual Sex." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 October 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041020095115.htm>.
Case Western Reserve University. (2004, October 20). Potential For Developing A New Cream Or Gel To Block AIDS Transmission During Heterosexual Sex. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041020095115.htm
Case Western Reserve University. "Potential For Developing A New Cream Or Gel To Block AIDS Transmission During Heterosexual Sex." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/10/041020095115.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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