Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study Pinpoints Protein's Role In Heart Failure Prevention

Date:
January 21, 2005
Source:
University Of North Carolina School Of Medicine
Summary:
Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have shown that a protein in cardiac muscle cells may play a crucial role in heart failure prevention.

CHAPEL HILL -- Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have shown that a protein in cardiac muscle cells may play a crucial role in heart failure prevention.

Related Articles


The protein is known technically by the unusual acronym MuRF1, or muscle-specific RING finger 1, and helps regulate cardiac cellular molecules involved in abnormal enlargement of the heart. This condition, known medically as cardiac hypertrophy, occurs in 50 percent to 60 percent of people older than age 70 and makes them more prone to developing a potentially fatal type of heart failure.

"People who develop cardiac hypertrophy are prone to diastolic heart failure. Their hearts contract normally but the thickened heart muscle can't keep the blood out of the lungs," said Dr. Cam Patterson, the study's senior author. Patterson is Henry A. Foscue distinguished professor of medicine and cardiology, and professor of pharmacology and cell and developmental biology at UNC. He also directs the Carolina Cardiovascular Biology Center.

In a report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Dec. 28, Patterson and co-authors said MuRF1 was responsible for signaling other molecules in heart cells to degrade another protein called troponin-1, a key player in heart muscle activity.

"Troponin-1 is a critical component of the cardiac contractile machinery," Patterson said. "It's part of the cardiac muscle cell that makes heart muscle beat."

When heart cells hypertrophy, or become enlarged, troponin-1 and other contractile proteins greatly increase in abundance, Patterson said. "And so one of the critical ways that MuRF1 reverses hypertrophy is by degrading proteins such as troponin-1."

Thus, the action of MuRF1 appears to determine the balance between hypertrophic (enlargement) and anti-hypertrophic signals in heart muscle cells, Patterson added. "This is really a fundamental observation. It has been known for some time that contractile proteins are degraded, but the specific molecules involved have not been defined until now."

Cardiologists consider cardiac hypertrophy as one of the most potent predictors for adverse cardiac outcomes, such as heart failure and arrhythmias, or abnormal heart rhythms. "It's as bad to have cardiac hypertrophy as it is to have had a heart attack," said Patterson. "Unfortunately, we have no specific therapies aimed at this condition. But our findings suggest that new drugs might be developed to reverse hypertrophy by targeting these ubiquitin ligase signaling pathways in cardiac cells."

###

Along with Patterson, co-authors of the report are Carolina Cardiovascular Biology Center postdoctoral researchers Drs. Vishram Kedar, Holly McDonough, Ranjana Arya and Hui-Hua Li; and, from Duke University, Dr. Howard A. Rockman, professor of medicine in the cardiology division. The research was supported by grants from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and the National Institute of General Medicine, components of the National Institutes of Health.

The Carolina Cardiovascular Biology Center, established in 2000, is a multidisciplinary, multidepartmental facility that serves as a focal point for interactions among basic, translational and clinical scientists studying all aspects of cardiovascular disease. Areas of specific interest include atherosclerosis and other vascular diseases, angiogenesis and cardiovascular development, cardiovascular physiology, and diseases of hemostasis.

Cardiovascular diseases represent the most common cause of death and disability nationwide.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of North Carolina School Of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of North Carolina School Of Medicine. "Study Pinpoints Protein's Role In Heart Failure Prevention." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 January 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050111120159.htm>.
University Of North Carolina School Of Medicine. (2005, January 21). Study Pinpoints Protein's Role In Heart Failure Prevention. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050111120159.htm
University Of North Carolina School Of Medicine. "Study Pinpoints Protein's Role In Heart Failure Prevention." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050111120159.htm (accessed March 2, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, March 2, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Treadmill Test Can Predict Chance Of Death Within A Decade

Treadmill Test Can Predict Chance Of Death Within A Decade

Newsy (Mar. 2, 2015) Johns Hopkins researchers analyzed 58,000 heart stress tests to come up with a formula that predicts a person&apos;s chances of dying in the next decade. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
GlaxoSmithKline and Novartis Try Swapping Success

GlaxoSmithKline and Novartis Try Swapping Success

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 2, 2015) GlaxoSmithKline and Novartis have completed a series of asset swaps worth more than $20 billion. As Grace Pascoe reports they say the deal will reshape both drugmakers. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Can West Africa Rebuild After Ebola?

How Can West Africa Rebuild After Ebola?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 2, 2015) How best to rebuild the three West African countries struggling with Ebola will be discussed in Brussels this week. As Hayley Platt reports Sierra Leone has the toughest job ahead - its once thriving economy has been ravaged by the disease. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Often Give In To Vaccine-Wary Parents

Doctors Often Give In To Vaccine-Wary Parents

Newsy (Mar. 2, 2015) A new survey published in the journal Pediatrics found many doctors are giving in to parents&apos; requests to delay vaccinating their children. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins