Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Brain Research To Help In Fight Against Cardiovascular Disease

Date:
April 3, 2005
Source:
University Of Liverpool
Summary:
Scientists at the University of Liverpool, supported by the British Heart Foundation, are studying blood flow in the brain to further medical understanding of cardiovascular disease.

Scientists at the University of Liverpool, supported by the British Heart Foundation, are studying blood flow in the brain to further medical understanding of cardiovascular disease.

Related Articles


Dr John Quayle and Dr Tomoko Kamishima, from the University’s Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, are investigating why blood supply to the brain becomes inadequate during serious illnesses, such as strokes. Approximately one in eight people are diagnosed with a disease of the heart or circulatory system in the UK each year and more than a 100,000 of these cases result in death.

Dr Quayle is studying blood flow by analysing how a muscle - which lines the walls of arteries in the brain - contracts to force the arteries to become narrower and reduce blood flow. These cerebral arteries are no bigger than the width of human hair and are the most important in regulating blood flow.

Dr Quayle explains: “Blood is supplied to the brain through blood vessels called cerebral arteries. However, despite their importance, the behaviour of these vessels is not well understood. The vessels are lined with muscle cells and when these cells contract in response to stimulation, the arteries become narrower and reduce blood flow. This can cause severe damage to the heart and other major organs in the body.

“Many scientists have used large arteries to study heart disease, but we have shown that the physiology of large arteries and small arteries is very different. We believe that a better understanding of these very small arteries will be important in developing treatments for heart diseases.

“There are occasions when arteries have to contract as a natural function, but so far scientists have been unable to identify how this occurs. Understanding the basic mechanism that dictates artery contraction is the first step in solving heart problems.”

The team will conduct the research by using molecules called nucleotides, which stimulate muscle contraction. Nucleotides also have a role in atherosclerosis, which clogs up the arteries with fatty deposits, preventing blood flow to the rest of the body.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Liverpool. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Liverpool. "Brain Research To Help In Fight Against Cardiovascular Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 April 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050325234622.htm>.
University Of Liverpool. (2005, April 3). Brain Research To Help In Fight Against Cardiovascular Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050325234622.htm
University Of Liverpool. "Brain Research To Help In Fight Against Cardiovascular Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050325234622.htm (accessed January 25, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

AFP (Jan. 25, 2015) The World Health Organization&apos;s chief on Sunday admitted the UN agency had been caught napping on Ebola, saying it should serve a lesson to avoid similar mistakes in future. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Newsy (Jan. 24, 2015) Much of the Disneyland measles outbreak is being blamed on the anti-vaccination movement. The CDC encourages just about everyone get immunized. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

AP (Jan. 23, 2015) Public health officials are rushing to contain a measles outbreak that has sickened 70 people across 6 states and Mexico. The AP&apos;s Raquel Maria Dillon has more. (Jan. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 23, 2015) A Boston start-up is developing a wristband they say will help users break bad habits by jolting them with an electric shock. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins