Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Technique Shows Promise For Improved Straightening Of Crooked Nose

Date:
April 20, 2005
Source:
Journal Of The American Medical Association
Summary:
A surgical technique offers improved outcomes for straightening the middle third of the nose, a difficult to manage deformity, according to an article in the March issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

CHICAGO — A surgical technique offers improved outcomes for straightening the middle third of the nose, a difficult to manage deformity, according to an article in the March issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Straightening the crooked middle third of the nose, a deformity that compromises both appearance and the airway, can be a significant reconstructive challenge, according to background information in the article. The overlying skin and the tissue just beneath the skin are very thin, exposing any irregularity. The underlying structure is springy and difficult to straighten. In addition, the author notes, any crookedness left after surgery is visually obvious to the patient.

Martyn Mendelsohn, M.B., B.S., F.R.A.C.S., of the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia, reviewed 41 cases of rhinoplasty (plastic surgery of the nose), 26 men and 15 women, in which he used a high density porous polyethylene (HDPP) graft to structurally reinforce the nose. Twenty of the cases were repeat surgeries, the crookedness resulting from previous rhinoplasty. The graft material provides increased strength against further trauma and provides more stability than previous techniques, according to the author.

All 41 patients undergoing surgery with this technique, called extended spreader graft, had substantial improvement in the straightening of the middle third of the nose. One case showed improvement in the airway as well. Follow-up ranged from six months to two years. Results were documented by facial photography of frontal, lateral and base views and were assessed by an unbiased judge who was not informed of the pre- and post-operative status of the patients in the photographs. There were no cases of infection.

"This procedure is safe, effective, and reliable," the author concludes. "The use of porous polyethylene grafts ensures that an ideal graft size and shape can be used regardless of the amount or quality of septal cartilage [underlying structure] available. It leaves the external nose straight, smooth, and strong to reduce the effects of future scar contracture or trauma."

(Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2005;7:74-80. Available post-embargo at archfacial.com)


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal Of The American Medical Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Journal Of The American Medical Association. "New Technique Shows Promise For Improved Straightening Of Crooked Nose." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 April 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050420092311.htm>.
Journal Of The American Medical Association. (2005, April 20). New Technique Shows Promise For Improved Straightening Of Crooked Nose. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050420092311.htm
Journal Of The American Medical Association. "New Technique Shows Promise For Improved Straightening Of Crooked Nose." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050420092311.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two US Ebola Patients Leave Hospital Free of the Disease

Two US Ebola Patients Leave Hospital Free of the Disease

AFP (Aug. 21, 2014) Two American missionaries who were sickened with Ebola while working in Liberia and were treated with an experimental drug are doing better and have left the hospital, doctors say on August 21, 2014. Duration: 01:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) Contains graphic content. He's only 17. But Johntrell Bowles has wanted to be a doctor from a young age, despite the odds against him. He was recently the youngest participant in a cadaver program at the Indiana University NW medical school. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) It's unclear whether the American Ebola patients' recoveries can be attributed to an experimental drug or early detection and good medical care. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins