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Dogs And Robots Share NIST Special Test Arena

Date:
April 21, 2005
Source:
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Summary:
Bomb and drug sniffing dogs are regular visitors to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for training, not for emergency work. Every month as many as 10 to 20 dogs and their handlers from federal agencies as well as from local county and municipal police departments visit the arenas that NIST uses to test and evaluate urban search and rescue and explosive ordnance disposal robots.

Police Officer Michael Millsaps Jr. of the Amtrak Police Department rewards his dog Bak for finding a hidden gun under debris at the NIST reference test arena for urban search and rescue and explosive ordnance disposal robots. The white transmitters worn by both Millsaps and Bak can be used to track and record their movements as they proceed through the arena. Similar transmitters are attached to rescue robots and are used to analyze searching performance.
Credit: Photo by Gail Porter/NIST

Bomb and drug sniffing dogs are regular visitors to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for training, not for emergency work. Every month as many as 10 to 20 dogs and their handlers from federal agencies as well as from local county and municipal police departments visit the arenas that NIST uses to test and evaluate urban search and rescue and explosive ordnance disposal robots.

The arenas represent a building in various stages of collapse and provide a robot testing site for both pre- and post-disaster scenarios. The jumble of concrete collapsed walls and fallen debris also offers just the right challenge to sharpen the skills of the dogs who hunt for hidden drugs or patrol potential terrorist targets.

Small samples of explosive materials or narcotics are first hidden amid the rubble. Then individual dogs, under the watchful eyes of their handlers who are in a sense in training as well, seek out firearms, ammunition, explosives and chemical compounds used to build explosives or drugs such as cocaine or heroin. Once the dog finds the "hide," he or she sits silently, at attention, in front of the cache.

The individual dogs are trained in locating drugs or explosives, not both. Handlers must know why a dog is sitting, and in a real situation whether the find is safe to pick up. Success brings a shout of "That's my Boy," a rough, affectionate head tussle, a brief pulling match over a toy with the handler, and then the hunt goes on until all the hidden explosives or drugs are found.

"A dog just wants to play," said Sergeant Rick Hawkins of the NIH Police Department who coordinates the multi-agency K-9 visits to NIST. "When we go home we look at our paycheck. A dog has his toy and that's what he works for." Hawkins' six-year-old black Labrador, Flyer, is trained to find narcotics.

The police trainers appreciate having a unique indoor facility that challenges the dogs' skills and that is available on a regular basis. At the same time, the NIST robotics experts benefit from observing police techniques for systematically searching for explosives.

In April, NIST experts helped with the 2005 RoboCup German Open international competition in Paderborn, Germany, that used a newly constructed version of the NIST arenas to test the performance of the latest rescue robots.

###

A brief video describing the training of both dogs and robots at the NIST arena is available at: http://realex.nist.gov:8080/ramgen/robot2.smi. (Requires RealPlayer)


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Institute of Standards and Technology. "Dogs And Robots Share NIST Special Test Arena." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 April 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050421204936.htm>.
National Institute of Standards and Technology. (2005, April 21). Dogs And Robots Share NIST Special Test Arena. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050421204936.htm
National Institute of Standards and Technology. "Dogs And Robots Share NIST Special Test Arena." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050421204936.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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