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Your Heart Could Indicate Whether You Have Kidney Problems

Date:
May 14, 2005
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
Cardiovascular risk factors appear to indicate deteriorating renal function in all adults. Researchers discovered various indicators of heart or vascular disease can signal that kidney function is on the decline in the general population, as published in the May issue of Kidney International.

May 12, 2005 - Cardiovascular risk factors appear to indicate deteriorating renal function in all adults. Researchers discovered various indicators of heart or vascular disease can signal that kidney function is on the decline in the general population, as published in the May issue of Kidney International.

While generalized atherosclerosis (hardening of arteries and blood vessels) has been increasingly recognized as a cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a recent study of over 8,500 patients discovered that this same disease also affects renal function in those who do not suffer from ESRD. Together with blood pressure, age, and body mass index, different cardiovascular risk factors can have varied impact on kidney function.

"Studies show that the mechanisms underlying renal function abnormalities in the general population are limited," states Paul E. De Jong, corresponding author of the study. "As presently many subjects present with ESRD without known renal diseases, and the prevalence of obesity and generalized atherosclerosis are increasing, we need to know which factors should be detected and should be monitored under treatment."

Findings show that albuminuria, excessive presence of the protein albumin in the urine often associated with diabetes and kidney disease, might be a such factor to monitor, even more so than blood pressure and cholesterol.

The International Society of Nephrology advocates proactive albuminuria screening for early detection of renal impairment and cardiovascular risk. According to the Society, over 60 million people worldwide have some degree of chronic kidney disease and the costs of kidney failure, heart failure and diabetes account for the majority of health budgets today.

###

Dr. Paul E. De Jong has been a professor in Nephrology since 1984 and is currently affiliated with the University Medical Center Groningen and Groningen University. Since 1997, he has coordinated the PREVEND study, evaluating the impact of albuminuria as a prognostic marker for renal and vascular disease in the general population.

About Kidney International
Kidney International, published on behalf of the International Society of Nephrology, is one of the most cited journals in nephrology. Kidney International delivers current laboratory and clinical research on renal medicine. This peer-reviewed, leading international journal is the most authoritative forum for renal science and medicine. Kidney International continues to be a vital source of information for researchers around the world. For additional information on the journal, please visit www.blackwellpublishing.com/kid.

About the International Society of Nephrology
The International Society of Nephrology (ISN), a not-for-profit association founded in 1960, is committed to the worldwide advancement of education, science and patient care in nephrology. This goal is achieved by means of the Society's journals, the organization of international congresses and symposia, and various outreach programs around the world. The ISN acts as an international forum on nephrology for leading nephrologists as well as young investigators, from both developed and emerging countries. Further information is available at www.isn-online.org.

About Blackwell Publishing
Blackwell Publishing is the world's leading society publisher, partnering with more than 600 academic and professional societies. Blackwell publishes over 750 journals and 600 text and reference books annually, across a wide range of academic, medical, and professional subjects.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Your Heart Could Indicate Whether You Have Kidney Problems." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 May 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050513225331.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2005, May 14). Your Heart Could Indicate Whether You Have Kidney Problems. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050513225331.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Your Heart Could Indicate Whether You Have Kidney Problems." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050513225331.htm (accessed August 2, 2014).

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