Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Increased Vitamin B Consumption Reduces Women's Risk Of Colorectal Cancer

Date:
June 5, 2005
Source:
American Gastroenterological Association
Summary:
According to a study published in the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) journal Gastroenterology, women with a high dietary intake of vitamin B6 over several years have a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Women who consume moderate to large amounts of alcohol in addition to vitamin B6 have more than a 70 percent reduced risk of developing CRC.

Bethesda, Maryland (June 3, 2005) -- According to a study published in the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) journal Gastroenterology, women with a high dietary intake of vitamin B6 over several years have a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Women who consume moderate to large amounts of alcohol in addition to vitamin B6 have more than a 70 percent reduced risk of developing CRC.

Related Articles


"Consuming a diet high in vitamin B6 may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer in women, more specifically those who consume alcohol," said Susanna Larsson, MSc, study author with the Karolinska Institutet. "Inadequate vitamin B6 status may lead to the development of cancerous polyps in the colon, so it is important for women to maintain a normal to high intake of vitamin B6."

The second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, it is estimated that more than 28,000 women with CRC will die in 2005. While increased vitamin B6 consumption decreases the risk of colorectal cancer, it does not eliminate the need for regular screening. Guidelines of multiple agencies and professional societies underscore the importance of colorectal cancer screening for all individuals 50 years of age and older.

Researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden and the Harvard School of Public Health used data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort to evaluate the association between long-term dietary vitamin B6 intake from food sources and colorectal cancer risk, and its modification by alcohol consumption. Nearly 67,000 women, aged 40 to 75 years, responded to a questionnaire that solicited data on diet, family history of CRC and use of dietary supplements. Researchers observed that alcohol consumption in women with low vitamin B6 intake resulted in higher risk of developing colorectal cancer and that increasing intake reduces this risk significantly.

The recommended daily dietary intake of vitamin B6 for non-pregnant women in the United States is 1.3 to 1.5 mg. Vitamin B6 is found in a wide variety of foods, including fortified cereals, beans, meat, poultry, fish, and some fruits and vegetables. It performs a wide variety of functions in the body, including helping to maintain normal blood glucose levels, fighting off infections and creating hemoglobin to ensure that oxygen gets to important organs and tissues.

While the study shows that consuming high amounts of vitamin B6 reduces the risk of colorectal cancer in women who drink, researchers say findings need further confirmation in large prospective cohort or intervention studies.

"These findings may have important implications for the prevention of colorectal cancer in women who consume alcohol because their vitamin B6 status can be easily improved through dietary modifications, vitamin supplementation and fortification," said Larsson.

More information about colorectal cancer is available at http://www.gastro.org.

###

About the Study

Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health and the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden conducted a population-based study using the Swedish Mammography Cohort, a study established between 1987 and 1990 that takes into account information on diet, educational level, weight and height of 66,651 women aged 40 to 75 years living in two central Swedish counties. Researchers sought to evaluate the association between long-term dietary vitamin B-intake and colorectal cancer risk, and its modification by alcohol consumption in this cohort of women.

About the AGA

The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) is dedicated to the mission of advancing the science and practice of gastroenterology. Founded in 1897, the AGA is the oldest medical-specialty society in the United States. The AGA's 14,000 members include physicians and scientists who research, diagnose and treat disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and liver. On a monthly basis, the AGA publishes two highly respected journals, Gastroenterology and Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The AGA's annual meeting is Digestive Disease Week, which is held each May and is the largest international gathering of physicians, researchers and academics in the fields of gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy and gastrointestinal surgery.

About Gastroenterology

Gastroenterology, the official journal of the AGA, is the most prominent journal in the subspecialty and is in the top one percent of indexed medical journals internationally. The journal publishes clinical and basic studies of all aspects of the digestive system, including the liver and pancreas, as well as nutrition. The journal is abstracted and indexed in Biological Abstracts, CABS, Chemical Abstracts, Current Contents, Excerpta Medica, Index Medicus, Nutrition Abstracts and Science Citation Index. For more information, visit: http://www.gastrojournal.org/


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Gastroenterological Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Gastroenterological Association. "Increased Vitamin B Consumption Reduces Women's Risk Of Colorectal Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 June 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050605182630.htm>.
American Gastroenterological Association. (2005, June 5). Increased Vitamin B Consumption Reduces Women's Risk Of Colorectal Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050605182630.htm
American Gastroenterological Association. "Increased Vitamin B Consumption Reduces Women's Risk Of Colorectal Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050605182630.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A team of scientists led by Danish chemist Jorn Christensen says they have isolated two chemical compounds within an existing antipsychotic medication that could be used to help a range of failing antibiotics work against killer bacterial infections, such as Tuberculosis. Jim Drury went to meet him. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Newsy (Dec. 21, 2014) Carnegie Mellon researchers found frequent hugs can help people avoid stress-related illnesses. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins