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Guidelines Help Parents Decide What's Best To Feed Baby

Date:
June 27, 2005
Source:
USDA / Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
Guidelines to help parents determine what's best to feed their infants and toddlers are being developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and cooperators.

A 20-month-old boy enjoying a healthful snack.
Credit: Photo by Stephen Ausmus

Guidelines to help parents determine what's best to feed their infants and toddlers are being developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and cooperators.

The new guidelines, developed by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC) in Houston, Texas, the American Dietetic Association and Gerber Foods Products company, fill an information gap. That's because much of the available nutrition information has been intended mainly for children ages 2 years and up, or for infants under 6 months. The new guidelines are meant for toddlers between those ages.

Called the "Start Healthy Feeding Guidelines," the recommendations complement and expand--not replace--early-feeding recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other expert groups. The guidelines provide practical and useful recommendations based on scientifically sound evidence.

Taking the lead for CNRC are Nancy Butte and William Heird, both professors of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine and the CNRC. The two were part of the panel of leading pediatric experts who developed the new guidelines, which were prompted in part by the growing problem of childhood obesity. Health care providers need a better foundation for making infant and toddler feeding recommendations, and they need better tools for communicating the importance of establishing healthy habits in early childhood.

The guideline's website, http://www.gerber.com/starthealthy, provides content from the expert panel, including a comprehensive brochure with tips and information on feeding young children. Guideline topics include coping with food allergies and sensitivities, how to feed infants and develop children's self-feeding skills, and the importance of physical activity.

The CNRC is operated by Baylor in cooperation with Texas Children's Hospital and ARS, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's chief scientific research agency.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by USDA / Agricultural Research Service. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

USDA / Agricultural Research Service. "Guidelines Help Parents Decide What's Best To Feed Baby." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 June 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050619193915.htm>.
USDA / Agricultural Research Service. (2005, June 27). Guidelines Help Parents Decide What's Best To Feed Baby. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050619193915.htm
USDA / Agricultural Research Service. "Guidelines Help Parents Decide What's Best To Feed Baby." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050619193915.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

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