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Aquatic Plants May Hold Key To Advancing Plant Disease Management

Date:
July 13, 2005
Source:
American Phytopathological Society
Summary:
The way aquatic plants respond to plant disease and climate change may have applications for managing land-based agriculture, say plant pathologists with The American Phytopathological Society (APS).

St. Paul, MN (July 6, 2005) - The way aquatic plants respond to plant disease and climate change may have applications for managing land-based agriculture, say plant pathologists with The American Phytopathological Society (APS).

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According to David Schmale III, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, many aquatic plants possess unique mechanisms of resistance to microbial attack. "Through further study, plant pathologists may be able to apply the novel mechanisms found in aquatic plants to land-based agricultural systems," said Schmale.

Research done on the management of freshwater plant disease has created environmentally sound methods of plant disease control. While plant pathologists typically try to save plants from plant disease, plant pathologists can use plant pathogens as a means to control highly invasive freshwater plants that harm native aquatic plants. Studies of marine plant diseases continue to provide insight as to how climatic change influences disease development. "Emerging marine diseases, such as coral diseases, are creating a major shift in the marine flora," Schmale said. "Global warming and climate change appear to be increasing the rate at which these diseases spread and intensify," he said.

The biology, ecology, and control of aquatic plant diseases in freshwater and marine environments will be addressed during the Aquatic Plant Pathology symposium at the APS Annual Meeting in Austin, TX, July 30 - August 3, 2005. The symposium will be held Sunday, July 31 from 1-5 p.m. at the Austin Convention Center.

###

The American Phytopathological Society (APS) is a non-profit, professional scientific organization. The research of the organization's 5,000 worldwide members advances the understanding of the science of plant pathology and its application to plant health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Phytopathological Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Phytopathological Society. "Aquatic Plants May Hold Key To Advancing Plant Disease Management." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 July 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050712234634.htm>.
American Phytopathological Society. (2005, July 13). Aquatic Plants May Hold Key To Advancing Plant Disease Management. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050712234634.htm
American Phytopathological Society. "Aquatic Plants May Hold Key To Advancing Plant Disease Management." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050712234634.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

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