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Ancient Iraqi Harp Reproduced By Liverpool Engineers

Date:
August 1, 2005
Source:
University of Liverpool
Summary:
A team of engineers at the University of Liverpool has helped reproduce an ancient Iraqi harp -- the Lyre of Ur. Engineers from the University's Lairdside Laser Engineering Centre (LLEC) employed revolutionary laser technology to engrave authentic designs onto Gulf Shell (mother of pearl) -- the original material used to decorate the body of the harp.

Sir Leonard Woolley with the original Lyre at the excavation site.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Liverpool

Liverpool, UK (28 July 2005) -- A team of engineers at the University of Liverpool has helped reproduce an ancient Iraqi harp -- the Lyre of Ur.

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Engineers from the University’s Lairdside Laser Engineering Centre (LLEC) employed revolutionary laser technology to engrave authentic designs onto Gulf Shell (mother of pearl) – the original material used to decorate the body of the harp.

Dr Carmel Curran, who carried out the work at the LLEC, commented: “This is the first time we have laser processed this type of material and the results are remarkable. It is fantastic to be involved in the recreation of such a piece of history.

“The shells we engraved came from the Indian Ocean. The laser techniques we used to engrave the shell are normally applied to materials such as plastics, metals, fabric and wood.”

The lyre was discovered in a mass suicide grave in the ancient city of Ur in Iraq by British archaeologist, Sir Leonard Woolley. Uncovered in 1929, the remains were kept in a museum in Baghdad until they were destroyed during the recent war in Iraq.

The original gold lyre – nearly 5,000 years old - belonged to the Sumerian Royal family and was found with three other musical instruments alongside 74 bodies in the grave of Queen Puabi, who died around 2,600 BC.

On hearing the lyre had been destroyed, a British harp enthusiast decided to replicate the unique golden lyre so it could be played at harp festivals around the world.

Andy Lowings, project co-ordinator and harp enthusiast, said: “The Lyre of Ur is one of the world’s most unique instruments – the remains of only two similar originals found by Sir Leonard still exist but are unplayable. It is fantastic that the harp has been reproduced using original materials and can now be played and enjoyed by music lovers worldwide.”

The lyre has been played by musicians from around the globe at several high profile events including the Live 8 Eden Project concert and the Edinburgh International Harp Festival.

Volunteers from several organisations teamed up to help recreate the Lyre, which is made of gold, cedar wood, lapis lazuli and pink limestone.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Liverpool. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Liverpool. "Ancient Iraqi Harp Reproduced By Liverpool Engineers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 August 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050731231728.htm>.
University of Liverpool. (2005, August 1). Ancient Iraqi Harp Reproduced By Liverpool Engineers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 5, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050731231728.htm
University of Liverpool. "Ancient Iraqi Harp Reproduced By Liverpool Engineers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050731231728.htm (accessed March 5, 2015).

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