Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Omega-6 Fatty Acids Cause Prostate Tumor Cell Growth In Culture

Date:
August 2, 2005
Source:
University of California - San Francisco
Summary:
A study conducted at the San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC) has demonstrated that omega-6 fatty acids such as the fat found in corn oil promote the growth of prostate tumor cells in the laboratory. The study also identifies a potential new molecular target for anti-tumor drugs: an enzyme known as cPLA2, which plays a key role in the chain leading from omega-6 fatty acids to prostate tumor cell growth.

A study conducted at the San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC)has demonstrated that omega-6 fatty acids such as the fat found in cornoil promote the growth of prostate tumor cells in the laboratory. Thestudy also identifies a potential new molecular target for anti-tumordrugs: an enzyme known as cPLA2, which plays a key role in the chainleading from omega-6 fatty acids to prostate tumor cell growth.

The study was led by Millie Hughes-Fulford, PhD, director of theLaboratory of Cell Growth at SFVAMC and scientific advisor to the U.S.Undersecretary of Health for the Department of Veterans Affairs. It isbeing published in the September 2005 issue of Carcinogenesis, and iscurrently available online.

Working with human prostate cancer cells in tissue culture,Hughes-Fulford and her fellow researchers identified for the first timea direct chain of causation: When introduced into prostate tumor cellsin culture, omega-6 fatty acid causes the production of cPLA2, whichthen causes the production of the enzyme COX2. In turn, COX2 stimulatesthe release of PGE2, a hormone-like molecule that promotes cell growth.

"What's important about this is that omega-6 fatty acids are foundin corn oil and most of the oils used in bakery goods," saysHughes-Fulford, who is also an adjunct professor of medicine at theUniversity of California, San Francisco (UCSF). "Which means that ifyou're eating a diet high in omega-6 fatty acids, it's possible thatyou're turning on this cancer cascade, which has been shown to be acommon denominator in the growth of prostate, colorectal, and somebreast cancers."

The study points out that 60 years ago in the United States, thedietary ratio of omega-6 to omega-3, a beneficial fatty acid, was 1 to2. Today, the ratio is 25 to 1. Over that same 60 years, the incidenceof prostate cancer in the U.S. has increased steadily.

Hughes-Fulford also found that flurbiprofen, a non-steroidalanti-inflammatory drug commonly prescribed for arthritis, blocked theproduction of cPLA2 and broke the chain leading to cell growth. Thismeans, she says, that new drugs might be developed that couldspecifically target cPLA2 and prevent COX2 from being released.

"COX2 has been implicated in the growth of many types of tumors,"she notes. "So if you can find a way to block that cascade in thetumor, starting with cPLA2, you might have a new way of modifying orslowing tumor growth."

Hughes-Fulford points out that cPLA2 inhibitors would avoid theproblems inherent in the class of drugs known as COX2 inhibitors. Thesedrugs have been shown to be effective against tumor growth as well asin treating the pain associated with inflammatory conditions such asarthritis, but have been implicated in increased risk of cardiovascularproblems in people who take them regularly. "COX2 inhibitors alsoinhibit prostacyclins, which are enzymes that are beneficial to theheart, and cPLA2 inhibitors would not affect those," she explains.

In future research, Hughes-Fulford will be looking at the overalleffect of different types of fatty acids on different tumor types incell lines as well as human biopsies. She plans a study that willcorrelate type of fatty acid with tumor stage and grade in order toobtain a clearer picture of specific effects of different fats on tumorprogression.

Co-authors of the study were Raymond R. Tjandrawinata, PhD, of UCSF,Chai-Fei Li, BA, of SFVAMC, and Sina Sayyah, BA, of SFVAMC and UCSF.

###

The research was funded by awards from the U.S. Department ofVeterans Affairs and in part by grants from the National Aeronauticsand Space Administration. Funding was administered by the NorthernCalifornia Institute for Research and Education (NCIRE).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - San Francisco. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of California - San Francisco. "Omega-6 Fatty Acids Cause Prostate Tumor Cell Growth In Culture." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 August 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050802123505.htm>.
University of California - San Francisco. (2005, August 2). Omega-6 Fatty Acids Cause Prostate Tumor Cell Growth In Culture. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050802123505.htm
University of California - San Francisco. "Omega-6 Fatty Acids Cause Prostate Tumor Cell Growth In Culture." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050802123505.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Patient Told Hospital He Was from Liberia

Ebola Patient Told Hospital He Was from Liberia

AP (Oct. 1, 2014) The first Ebola patient diagnosed in the U.S. initially went to a Dallas emergency room last week but was sent home, despite telling a nurse that he had been in disease-ravaged West Africa, the hospital acknowledged Wednesday. (Oct. 1) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins