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UCR Chemists Prepare Molecules That Accelerate Chemical Reactions For Manufacturing Drugs

Date:
August 28, 2005
Source:
University of California - Riverside
Summary:
Chemists at the University of California, Riverside have synthesized a new class of carbenes -- molecules that have unusual carbon atoms -- that is expected to have wide applications in the pharmaceutical industry, ultimately resulting in a reduction in the price of drugs. Called cyclic alkyl amino carbenes, the molecules attach themselves to metals, such as palladium, to form highly efficient catalysts that allow chemical transformations otherwise considered impossible.

Vincent Lavallo, first author of the research paper.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of California - Riverside

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Called cyclic alkyl amino carbenes or CAACs, the molecules attachthemselves to metals, such as palladium, to form highly efficientcatalysts that allow chemical transformations otherwise consideredimpossible. The carbenes modulate the properties of the metals to whichthey are bound and can facilitate and speed up reactions involvingtheir use.

Study results appear in the Angewandte Chemie International Edition, and were published online Aug. 1.

A carbene is a molecule that has a carbon atom with sixelectrons instead of the usual eight. Because of the electrondeficiency, carbenes are highly reactive and usually unstable innature.

In their paper, the UCR chemists discuss a set of chemicalreactions involving the use of catalysts other than those that areCAAC-based. The authors note that these catalysts need strong heatingto be effective. They add that the CAAC-based catalysts, on the otherhand, can be used not only at room temperature but also in smalleramounts than is necessary for the other catalysts.

"For more than a century, most catalysts were prepared usingchemical compounds called phosphines," said Guy Bertrand, the leadauthor of the study and Distinguished Professor of chemistry. "But inthe 1990s, carbenes were found to be useful to make catalysts. The newcarbenes we have prepared in the laboratory are such that they protectthe metals to which they bind, making the metal catalysts more stableand longer lasting."

Because nitrogen atoms stabilize a carbene when they areadjacent to it, chemists believed until now that two nitrogen atomswere necessary in a carbene to make efficient catalysts. But having twonitrogen atoms also imposes structural limitations at the center of thecarbene.

The carbenes synthesized by the UCR chemists has only onenitrogen atom, which lends the molecule a far more flexible structure.In effect, the carbenes are bigger at the metallic center of thecatalyst, a feature that improves the efficiency of the catalyst.

"We started this project nearly two years ago," said VincentLavallo, an undergraduate researcher in Bertrand's laboratory and thefirst author of the paper. "The carbene-based catalysts we report cansimplify complex chemical preparations. Further, just mild temperaturesare needed for the catalyst to be effective. Because of the catalyst'slongevity, you need only a small amount to achieve your final product.All of this can dramatically reduce the cost of manufacturing drugs,given that pharmaceutical companies are increasingly usingcarbene-supported catalysts for their chemical reactions."

Bertrand's research group plans to continue to modify the newcarbenes to find more efficient catalysts. "We're looking also for newcatalytic reactions facilitated by these new carbene metal complexes,"Lavallo said. "The CAACs have made the field of carbene chemistry moreexciting than ever."

Yves Canac, Carsten Pr--sang and Bruno Donnadieu of UCRassisted with the study. The National Institutes of Health and thechemicals manufacturer Rhodia provided support.



Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - Riverside. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of California - Riverside. "UCR Chemists Prepare Molecules That Accelerate Chemical Reactions For Manufacturing Drugs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 August 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050819130534.htm>.
University of California - Riverside. (2005, August 28). UCR Chemists Prepare Molecules That Accelerate Chemical Reactions For Manufacturing Drugs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050819130534.htm
University of California - Riverside. "UCR Chemists Prepare Molecules That Accelerate Chemical Reactions For Manufacturing Drugs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050819130534.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

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