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Scientists Describe New Way To Peer Inside Bacteria

Date:
August 31, 2005
Source:
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Summary:
As part of the search for better ways to track and clean up soil contaminants, scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Stony Brook University have developed a new way to "image" the internal chemistry of bacteria. The technique will allow scientists to "see" at the molecular level how soil-dwelling microbes interact with pollutants, help scientists better understand and prevent bacterial diseases, and possibly find ways to detect or disable bacteria used in a terror attack.

This figure shows a single cell of Clostridium sp. (a strictly-anaerobic, soil-dwelling bacterium) as imaged by scanning trasmission x-ray spectromicroscopy (left). By analyzing the x-ray absorption spectrum, scientists can pick up subtle biochemical differences between the bulk of the cell body (yellow) and a tiny spore (green) forming inside. This early stage of spore formation would be invisible to other imaging techniques.
Credit: Image courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory

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"The more we learn about soil microbe chemistry, thebetter we'll be able to predict the movement of contaminants in theenvironment," said Brookhaven microbiologist Jeffrey Gillow. "What welearn might also suggest new ways to harness microorganisms toimmobilize things like heavy metals and radioactive contaminants," hesaid. Gillow will give a talk on the new method at the 230th nationalmeeting of the American Chemical Society in Washington, D.C. on Monday,August 29, 2005 at 11:10 a.m. in room 204C of the Washington ConventionCenter.

Called x-ray spectromicroscopy, the method uses theextremely bright x-rays available at Brookhaven's National SynchrotronLight Source (NSLS) -- but not just to take pictures. At the NSLS, thescientists can actually "tune" the energy level of the beam to measuresubtle differences in the energy absorbed by different forms of carbon.This carbon absorption spectrum, or "fingerprint," reveals detailedbiochemical information about what is inside and around the bacterialcells -- and can even detect the formation of bacterial spores at anearly stage invisible to other methods.

"We are starting to learna lot more about the molecular chemistry of these bacteria," saidGillow. "The goal is to understand better how they interact with metalsand radionuclides."

The technique may also reveal details aboutthe process of bacterial spore formation. This could be important toenvironmental cleanup because spore-forming microbes often live incontaminated environments. It might also offer new targets for thedetection of weaponized bacteria (by finding spores at an early stage),or help thwart disease or a terrorist attack by finding ways to preventthe spores from germinating into active, infective bacterial cells.

Withthis technique, Gillow added, samples can be studied wet or dry,without staining, sectioning, or any other intervention such as thoseused in electron and fluorescence microscopy.

This work is acollaborative effort of the Center for Environmental Molecular Science-- which consists of scientists from Stony Brook University andBrookhaven Lab -- and the University of Guelph in Canada. Drawing onthe expertise of microbiologists, chemists, and physicists, it crossestraditional boundaries between scientific disciplines to addressproblems of global significance. The work was funded by the U.S.National Science Foundation and the Office of Biological andEnvironmental Research within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office ofScience.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Brookhaven National Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Brookhaven National Laboratory. "Scientists Describe New Way To Peer Inside Bacteria." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 August 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831080136.htm>.
Brookhaven National Laboratory. (2005, August 31). Scientists Describe New Way To Peer Inside Bacteria. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831080136.htm
Brookhaven National Laboratory. "Scientists Describe New Way To Peer Inside Bacteria." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831080136.htm (accessed April 19, 2015).

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