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An Apple Or A Pear? It's More Than A Question Of Taste

Date:
September 16, 2005
Source:
American College of Cardiology
Summary:
Eating an apple is infinitely better than looking like one, according to experts at the American College of Cardiology (ACC). Humor aside, research has drawn significant links between body shape and heart disease. The American College of Cardiology is hoping to reshape America by highlighting this new health data on World Heart Day.
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BETHESDA, MD -- Eating an apple is infinitely better than looking likeone, according to experts at the American College of Cardiology (ACC).Humor aside, research has drawn significant links between body shapeand heart disease. The American College of Cardiology is hoping toreshape America by highlighting this new health data on World HeartDay.

"People whose fat collects around the waist - the classic appleshape - are at higher risk of heart disease than their pear-shapedcounterparts, whose weight collects around the hips," said Roger S.Blumenthal, M.D., F.A.C.C., director of The Johns Hopkins CiccaroneCenter for the Prevention of Heart Disease. "The majority of heartdisease is preventable."

This September 25th marks the fifth annual World Heart Day witha theme of "Healthy Weight, Healthy Shape." The effort will focus onpreventive measures and seeks to remind people of the risks leading tocardiovascular disease.

Dr. Blumenthal added, "Cardiovascular disease is often notoptimally managed. Often physicians could do a better job of motivatingpatients to improve their lifestyle habits."

World Heart Day provides a simple start to understanding thepersonal risk of heart disease, according to Blumenthal. "Where doesyour body collect fat? Is your body shape more like an apple or apear?"

According to the ACC official guidelines for assessing the risk for cardiovascular disease, several factors are critical:

  • cigarette smoking of any amount
  • elevated blood pressure
  • elevated LDL cholesterol
  • diabetes mellitus
  • advancing age
  • obesity
  • physical inactivity

    "Good health doesn't just happen. It takes work and awareness ofone's habits," said Pamela Douglas, M.D., F.A.C.C., and president ofthe ACC. "Putting forth that effort to avoid heart disease is farpreferable to dealing with its consequences. World Heart Day has provento be an effective way to put a spotlight on the importance ofprevention and the actions that all of us can take to keep our heartshealthy."

    The ACC encourages individuals to work with their personal physicians to:

  • manage blood pressure
  • stop smoking and avoid secondhand smoke
  • control the intake of calories
  • increase exercise to at least 30 minutes for three or four days each week, with an ideal goal of daily exercise
  • manage co-existing medical conditions, like diabetes.
    ###

    World Heart Day is sponsored globally by the World Heart Federationand supported nationally by the American College of Cardiology. The ACCweb site is www.acc.org.

    The World Heart Federation, an NGO based in Geneva, Switzerland, is the global sponsor of World Heart Day. Web links are www.worldheartday.com and www.worldheart.org.

    The ACC is a 56-year-old professional medical society andteaching institution, representing more than 33,000 cardiovascularspecialists worldwide. It fosters optimal cardiovascular care anddisease prevention through professional education, promotion ofresearch, leadership in the development of standards and guidelines andthe formulation of healthcare policy.


  • Story Source:

    The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American College of Cardiology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


    Cite This Page:

    American College of Cardiology. "An Apple Or A Pear? It's More Than A Question Of Taste." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 September 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050916074858.htm>.
    American College of Cardiology. (2005, September 16). An Apple Or A Pear? It's More Than A Question Of Taste. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050916074858.htm
    American College of Cardiology. "An Apple Or A Pear? It's More Than A Question Of Taste." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050916074858.htm (accessed August 31, 2015).

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