Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Hopkins Researcher Links Gene Mutation With Poor Outcomes In People With Most Common Thyroid Cancer

Date:
January 9, 2006
Source:
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Summary:
Scientists at Johns Hopkins have found that a mutation in the gene that triggers production of a tumor growth protein is linked to poorer outcomes for patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). A report on the study is published in the December issue of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have found that a mutation in the gene that triggers production of a tumor growth protein is linked to poorer outcomes for patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). A report on the study is published in the December issue of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Mingzhao Xing, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, led the multi-center study. “This discovery should help physicians rate risk levels for patients with PTC,” he says.

The gene, called BRAF, is part of a signaling pathway that, when activated, is known to cause tumor growth, and mutations in BRAF have been linked to a variety of human cancers, the researchers say.

For the study, Xing and colleagues looked at information from 219 PTC patients from 1990 to 2004. The relationship among BRAF mutations, initial tumor characteristics, cancer recurrence and clinical outcomes was analyzed.

Results showed a “significant association” between BRAF mutation and spread of the cancer from the thyroid, lymph node metastasis, and advanced tumor stage at the time of surgery to remove the cancerous thyroid gland. The thyroid, a gland located beneath the voice box (larynx) that produces thyroid hormone, helps regulate body cell growth and metabolism. Results also showed that, given an average follow-up of three to four years, 25 percent of patients with BRAF mutations experienced tumor recurrence compared to 9 percent without evidence of BRAF mutations.

BRAF mutation was also an independent predictor of recurrence in patients with early disease, with 22 percent recurrence in those who had BRAF mutations versus only 5 percent in patients without the mutation.

Finally, BRAF mutation was more frequently associated with treatment failure in recurrent disease, according to the study.

“By illustrating a higher risk of poorer outcomes and recurrence, these results should help physicians perform better risk analysis of patients with PTC, which in turn will lead to more tailored treatment of the disease,” Xing said.

PTC is the most common thyroid cancer, accounting for 80 percent or more of thyroid malignancies. Although PTC is usually curable with surgical removal of the gland, often followed by radioiodine treatment, many cases recur and are fatal.

The ability to predict outcome has traditionally been based on such factors as patient age and gender, tumor size and the nature of the spread of disease. However, these criteria often leave uncertainty regarding the risk of tumor progression and recurrence.

“What we have is a novel molecular diagnostic tool that will improve existing clinical efforts,” Xing said.
The study patients were recruited from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; The Yale University School of Medicine; The Hospital for Endocrine Surgery in Kiev, Ukraine; and The University of Bologna Hospital in Bologna, Italy.

Other contributors from Hopkins include William H. Westra, M.D., professor in the Department of Pathology; Ralph P. Tufano, M.D, assistant professor in the Department of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery; David Sidransky, M.D., professor in the Department of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery, and Paul W. Ladenson, M.D., director of the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism.

The study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "Hopkins Researcher Links Gene Mutation With Poor Outcomes In People With Most Common Thyroid Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 January 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/01/060108215449.htm>.
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. (2006, January 9). Hopkins Researcher Links Gene Mutation With Poor Outcomes In People With Most Common Thyroid Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/01/060108215449.htm
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "Hopkins Researcher Links Gene Mutation With Poor Outcomes In People With Most Common Thyroid Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/01/060108215449.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) The new drug from Novartis could reduce cardiovascular deaths by 20 percent compared to other similar drugs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins