Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

High Blood Pressure And Kidney Disease Increase Risk For Heart Disease And Stroke In Older Americans

Date:
February 8, 2006
Source:
Case Western Reserve University
Summary:
Older Americans with high blood pressure and moderate to severe chronic kidney disease have a greater chance of developing heart disease than people with normal kidney function. These patients are also at higher risk for developing heart disease than kidney failure. And, the study found that new types of drugs such as ACE inhibitors and calcium-channel blockers are no better than older type diuretic drugs in preventing heart disease.

Older Americans with high blood pressure and moderate to severe chronic kidney disease have a greater chance of developing heart disease than people with normal kidney function. This finding is one of three in a new paper published in the Feb. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

The study also found these patients are at higher risk for developing heart disease than kidney failure (end stage renal disease). Lastly, it found for the first time that new types of drugs such as ACE inhibitors and calcium-channel blockers are no better than older type diuretic drugs, also called water pills, in preventing heart disease, and may be even less effective at preventing heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease.

Lead author of the study is Mahboob Rahman, M.D., M.S., of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals of Cleveland and the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center. The study was sponsored by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute and coordinated by the Clinical Trials Center at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston.

The study looked at more than 31,000 men and women 55 years and older who have high blood pressure and one other risk factor of cardiovascular disease, such as diabetes. A blood test was used to determine kidney function and severity of disease.

Patients with moderate chronic kidney disease had a 38 percent greater chance of developing heart disease and a 35 percent increase in overall cardiovascular disease (which includes heart disease, stroke, heart failure and others) than those with normal kidney function. In addition, patients with moderate to severe chronic kidney disease were twice as likely to develop heart disease than to experience kidney failure.

Rahman said the researchers are not quite sure why moderate and severe kidney disease leads to greater risk in heart disease. "It may be related to other factors associated with renal failure, such as anemia or abnormalities of calcium or phosphorus metabolism, for example. We are participating in other ongoing studies to establish the connections," he said.

The study also confirmed other earlier findings that diuretics are as effective as or better for preventing cardiovascular disease than newer drugs.

"Overall, ACE inhibitors and diuretics were about equally likely to protect against heart attacks," said Rahman, "but diuretics seemed more effective at preventing other kinds of cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and heart failure."

Calcium-channel blockers were about equal in protecting against all cardiovascular disease, but diuretics were more effective at preventing heart failure. These results held for all participants regardless of kidney function.

Rahman cautioned patients not to stop taking their medications after reading these results, however, and to consult their physicians.

He added, "Exercise, maintaining optimal body weight, smoking avoidance, and maintaining low cholesterol levels -- these are all things that should be done with renewed emphasis in most patients with high blood pressure. Most patient with hypertension and chronic kidney disease will require multiple medications to control blood pressure. Our results demonstrate that the risk for cardiovascular disease is lower if one of the medications is a diuretic."

He recommends patients who have high blood pressure talk to their doctors about measuring their kidney function to determine if they are suffering from chronic kidney disease.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Case Western Reserve University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Case Western Reserve University. "High Blood Pressure And Kidney Disease Increase Risk For Heart Disease And Stroke In Older Americans." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 February 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/02/060206234103.htm>.
Case Western Reserve University. (2006, February 8). High Blood Pressure And Kidney Disease Increase Risk For Heart Disease And Stroke In Older Americans. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/02/060206234103.htm
Case Western Reserve University. "High Blood Pressure And Kidney Disease Increase Risk For Heart Disease And Stroke In Older Americans." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/02/060206234103.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) A Texas man is lucky to be alive after he and three others floated for more than a day in the Gulf of Mexico when their boat sank during a fishing trip. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Since the arrival of Ebola in Ivory Coast, Ivorians have been abandoning their pets, particularly monkeys, in the fear that they may transmit the virus. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) New findings suggest men with a certain type of baldness at age 45 are 39 percent more likely to develop aggressive prostate cancer. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins