Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Wake Forest Physician Reports First Human Recipients Of Laboratory-grown Organs

Date:
April 4, 2006
Source:
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Summary:
The first human recipients of laboratory-grown organs were reported by Anthony Atala, MD, director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. In The Lancet, Atala describes long-term success in children and teenagers who received bladders grown from their own cells.

The first human recipients of laboratory-grown organs were reported by Anthony Atala, M.D., director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. In The Lancet, Atala describes long-term success in children and teenagers who received bladders grown from their own cells.

Related Articles


“This is one small step in our ability to go forward in replacing damaged tissues and organs,” said Atala, who is now working to grow 20 different tissues and organs, including blood vessels and hearts, in the laboratory.

The engineered bladders were grown from the patients’ own cells, so there is no risk of rejection. Scientists hope that laboratory-grown organs can one day help solve the shortage of donated organs available for transplantation. Atala reported that the bladders showed improved function over time -- with some patients being followed for more than seven years.

The study involved patients from 4 to 19 years old who had poor bladder function because of a congenital birth defect that causes incomplete closure of the spine. Their bladders were not pliable and the high pressures could be transmitted to their kidneys, possibly leading to kidney damage. They had urinary leakage, as frequently as every 30 minutes.

The main goal of the surgery was to reduce pressures inside the bladder to preserve the kidneys. In addition, urinary incontinence, which was a problem before the surgery, improved in all patients.

“It is rewarding when you can see the improved quality of life in these patients,” said Atala.

The patients were candidates for a procedure to repair the non-functioning bladder tissue with tissue from the intestines. This 100-year-old procedure is also used to “build” bladders for patients with bladder cancer. But because the intestine is designed to absorb nutrients and a bladder is designed to excrete, patients who have the procedure are prone to such problems as osteoporosis, increased risk of cancer and kidney stone formation.

Atala had been working since 1990 to build bladders from patients’ own cells and in 1999 implanted the first organ in a patient. His current report discusses the long-term results with seven children who had the surgery.

“We wanted to go slowly and carefully and make sure we did it the right way,” said Atala. “This is a small, limited experience, but it has enough follow-up to show us that tissue engineering is a viable tool that will allow us to tackle problems of similar magnitude.”

The report involves children who were treated at Boston Children’s Hospital when Atala was director of the Tissue Engineering and Cellular Therapeutics at Harvard Medical School. In 2004, Atala’s program moved to Wake Forest.

The process for growing each patient’s organ began with a biopsy to get samples of muscle cells and the cells that line the bladder walls. These cells were grown in a culture in the laboratory until there were enough cells to place onto a specially constructed biodegradable mold, or scaffold, shaped like a bladder.

The cells continued to grow. Then, seven or eight weeks after the biopsy, the engineered bladders were sutured to patients’ original bladders during surgery. The scaffold was designed to degrade as the bladder tissue integrated with the body. Testing showed that the engineered bladders functioned as well as bladders that are repaired with intestine tissue, but with none of the ill effects.

“We have shown that regenerative medicine techniques can be used to generate functional bladders that are durable,” said Atala. “This suggests that regenerative medicine may one day be a solution to the shortage of donor organs in this country for those needing transplants.”

Atala said the approach needs further study before it can be widely used. Additional clinical trials of the bladders are scheduled to begin later this year.

Atala also directs the National Regenerative Medicine Foundation, which recently received $1 million from the federal government to create a Soldier Treatment and Regeneration Consortium to research how to treat burns and grow limbs for wounded soldiers.

Atala’s co-researchers on the bladder report are Shay Soker, Ph.D., and James Yoo, Ph.D., with Wake Forest, and Alan Retik, M.D. and Stuart Bauer, M.D., with Harvard.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. "Wake Forest Physician Reports First Human Recipients Of Laboratory-grown Organs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 April 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060404084412.htm>.
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. (2006, April 4). Wake Forest Physician Reports First Human Recipients Of Laboratory-grown Organs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060404084412.htm
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. "Wake Forest Physician Reports First Human Recipients Of Laboratory-grown Organs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060404084412.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins