Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Ways To Synthesize A Biomedically Important Molecule

Date:
July 19, 2006
Source:
University Of Arkansas, Fayetteville
Summary:
The molecule Antascomicin B has the potential to both regenerate nerve growth and help scientists better understand immune system suppression in organ transplants, but its scarcity in nature means it must be synthesized in sufficient quantities for its medicinal usefulness to be determined. A University of Arkansas researcher has received a $322,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to attempt to synthesize this molecule using new chemistry.

University of Arkansas graduate student Wei Qi and chemistry professor Matt McIntosh hold models of organic molecules. Qi and McIntosh are working on the synthesis of biomedically important molecules. (Russell Cothren, University of Arkansas)

The molecule Antascomicin B has the potential to both regenerate nerve growth and help scientists better understand immune system suppression in organ transplants, but its scarcity in nature means it must be synthesized in sufficient quantities for its medicinal usefulness to be determined. A University of Arkansas researcher has received a $322,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to attempt to synthesize this molecule using new chemistry.

Creating a complex molecule from scratch is a complicated process, said Matt McIntosh, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.

“It’s kind of like a chess game,” he said. Researchers must create the right conditions in the right sequence in order to succeed. But with molecule building, like chess, success is not a sure thing.

“Now and then Mother Nature will checkmate us or lead us to a draw,” McIntosh said.

Graduate student Wei Qi demonstrated that the novel reactions would work in simple systems; the NSF grant will allow the researchers to combine these reactions to try to form this complex molecule.

This process could take years, McIntosh said. They have proposed building the molecule in 23 steps, and each step may succeed, fail or present its own individual challenges.

McIntosh likened the process to using a road map to plan a trip.
“You want to get from point ‘a’ to point ‘b’ using a chemical ‘route,’” he said. “You have a plan, but sometimes you hit a road block and you have to plan a new route.” This can happen when a reaction has a low yield or doesn’t produce the expected results.

However, failed reactions don’t always disappoint, McIntosh said. Sometimes reactions that don’t go as planned offer unexpected benefits – results that might have applications outside of the intended outcome, McIntosh said.

“That’s the way a lot of new chemistry is discovered,” he said.

Another research group has synthesized Antascomicin B, but McIntosh’s approach offers two new advantages; first, showing that these new reactions can be used to synthesize complex molecules, and second, that the different chemistry involved will help explain more details of how the molecule works.

“New science builds on previous science,” McIntosh said. You only have to look as far as the medicine cabinet to see the results of this kind of chemical synthesis.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Arkansas, Fayetteville. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Arkansas, Fayetteville. "New Ways To Synthesize A Biomedically Important Molecule." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 July 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/07/060718091749.htm>.
University Of Arkansas, Fayetteville. (2006, July 19). New Ways To Synthesize A Biomedically Important Molecule. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/07/060718091749.htm
University Of Arkansas, Fayetteville. "New Ways To Synthesize A Biomedically Important Molecule." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/07/060718091749.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

AP (July 23, 2014) 'Ray' the robotic parking valet at Dusseldorf Airport in Germany lets travelers to avoid the hassle of finding a parking spot before heading to the check-in desk. (July 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Boeing Ups Outlook on 52% Profit Jump

Boeing Ups Outlook on 52% Profit Jump

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 23, 2014) Commercial aircraft deliveries rose seven percent at Boeing, prompting the aerospace company to boost full-year profit guidance- though quarterly revenues missed analyst estimates. Bobbi Rebell reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Europe's Car Market on the Rebound?

Europe's Car Market on the Rebound?

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 23, 2014) Daimler kicks off a round of second-quarter earnings results from Europe's top carmakers with a healthy set of numbers - prompting hopes that stronger sales in Europe will counter weakness in emerging markets. Hayley Platt reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
9/11 Commission Members Warn of Terror "fatigue" Among American Public

9/11 Commission Members Warn of Terror "fatigue" Among American Public

Reuters - US Online Video (July 22, 2014) Ten years after releasing its initial report, members of the 9/11 Commission warn of the "waning sense of urgency" in combating terrorists attacks. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins