Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Women On Oxygen Therapy For COPD More Likely To Die Than Men

Date:
September 7, 2006
Source:
American Thoracic Society
Summary:
Among patients on long-term oxygen therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), women are more likely to die from the disease than men.

Among patients on long-term oxygen therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), women are more likely to die from the disease than men.

This study appears in the first issue for September 2006 of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, published by the American Thoracic Society.

Maria-Christina L. Machado, M.D., Ph.D., of the State Public Hospital of São Paulo in Brazil, and seven associates assessed 435 oxygen-dependent patients with COPD. Of the group, 184 women and 251 men were observed while on long-term oxygen therapy over a seven-year period.

After considering such factors as age, pack-years smoked, lung function test results and weight, investigators found females to be at a significantly higher risk for death from the disease.

"We found that women had a 54 percent increase in the risk of death after initiating long-term oxygen therapy compared with the men," said Dr. Machado.

The primary risk factor for developing COPD is smoking. The illness is characterized by chronic bronchitis and severe emphysema, which frequently co-exist, obstructing airflow to the lungs and interfering with normal breathing.

COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S., and the fifth in Brazil. In 2002, 10.7 million U.S. adults were estimated to have this debilitating disease. In 2004, the cost to the nation for COPD was $37.2 billion in direct and indirect health care costs.

"The only therapeutic regimen that has been shown to improve life expectancy in these patients is oxygen therapy," said Dr. Machado. "Interestingly, we found that men and women exhibited similar survival rates during the initial follow-up period. Differences in survival became more apparent only after three years of follow-up. The clinical management for COPD for both groups was similar and was based on the latest treatment guidelines."

The researchers noted previous research has shown that women who smoke had a greater decrease in basic lung function test results in comparison to men who smoke, suggesting a possible increased susceptibility to the development of COPD.

Prior studies also show that COPD affects other organ systems, as well as the lungs. For example, individuals who smoke and develop COPD further increase their risk of cardiovascular disease.

In an editorial on the research published in the same issue of the journal, David M. Mannino, M.D., of the University of Kentucky Medical Center, wrote: "One explanation for worse survival among women might be that some of the systemic complications of COPD, such as muscle dysfunction or depression, are more common in women and that these lead to worse outcomes."

"In two recently published studies of COPD, women had almost three times the prevalence of depression as men (38 percent versus 13 percent) and twice the prevalence of fat-free body mass depletion (40 percent versus 20 percent). While we do not know whether these complications were increased in the study by Dr. Machado and colleagues, it is plausible that the observed differences may have been related to these or other COPD-related complications that differ between the sexes."

He concluded: "Does sex influence survival in COPD? This is still an open question. This study suggests that women with COPD who are on oxygen may die more quickly than men. Whether this observation holds true in other cohorts with differing severity of COPD is yet to be determined. Careful analysis from both clinical data and observational trials will shed more light on this important question and, it is hoped, provide guidance for how to better intervene in the care of our patients with COPD."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Thoracic Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Thoracic Society. "Women On Oxygen Therapy For COPD More Likely To Die Than Men." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 September 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060901161324.htm>.
American Thoracic Society. (2006, September 7). Women On Oxygen Therapy For COPD More Likely To Die Than Men. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060901161324.htm
American Thoracic Society. "Women On Oxygen Therapy For COPD More Likely To Die Than Men." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060901161324.htm (accessed April 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, April 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) — A disease that has killed more than six million cave-dwelling bats in the United States is on the move and wildlife biologists are worried. White Nose Syndrome, discovered in New York in 2006, has now spread to 25 states. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) — That little voice telling you to exercise, get in shape and get healthy is probably coming from your boss. More companies are beefing up wellness programs to try and cut down their health care costs. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) — Scientists say for the extremely elderly, their stem cells might reach a state of exhaustion. This could limit one's life span. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) — The Food and Drug Administration wants to crack down on the use of e-cigarettes, banning the sale of the product to minors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins