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Raiding For Women? Female Remains In Graveyards Reflect War In Pre-Hispanic New Mexico

Date:
November 12, 2006
Source:
University of Chicago Press Journals
Summary:
An important new archaeological study from the December issue of Current Anthropology is the first to document interregional movement of women in the pre-Hispanic Southwest. Using an analysis of grave sites, the researchers found more female remains during periods of political influence, providing an interesting insight into the ways warfare may contribute the local archaeological record.

A portion of the large 12th and 13th-century A.D. site of Aztec, near the contemporary town of Aztec, New Mexico.
Credit: Courtesy: Tim Kohler

An important new archaeological study from the December issue of Current Anthropology is the first to document interregional movement of women in the pre-Hispanic Southwest. Using an analysis of grave sites, the researchers found more female remains during periods of political influence, providing an interesting insight into the ways warfare may contribute the local archaeological record.

"Warfare is common in small- and intermediate-scale societies all over the world, now and in prehistory. Capturing women was often either a goal, or a by-product, of such conflict," says archaeologist Tim Kohler (Washington State University), who authored the study with Kathryn Kramer Turner (U.S. Forest Service).

Analyzing data on 1,353 human remains from grave sites, Kohler and Kramer Turner found unexpectedly high ratios of female-to-male remains in the majestic 11th-century ruins in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, and a related 13th-century site to the north called Aztec, which are among the most famous pre-Hispanic sites in North America.

The researchers note that many sites from the same time period in the Mesa Verde region in Southwest Colorado -- just north of the Aztec site -- contain fewer women than they should. This imbalance may be the result of non-coercive movement, such as women migrating toward elites or the recruitment of women as specialized producers of prized items, such as jewelry or pottery. However, the apparent excesses of women coincide with a period of high young adult mortality, which indicates violence.

"Given the mirror symmetry of their sex ratios in the 1200s and the elevated death rates among young people in both areas, we suggest that societies in the Totah (which encompasses the Aztec site) obtained these women from Northern San Juan societies to the northwest through raiding and abduction," write the authors.

Excavations near the site of Aztec also revealed that some women in the Aztec's region were not buried in the usual respectful manner. Many of the women's remains also bear marks of abuse.

Sponsored by the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, Current Anthropology is a transnational journal devoted to research on humankind, encompassing the full range of anthropological scholarship on human cultures and on the human and other primate species. Communicating across the subfields, the journal features papers in a wide variety of areas, including social, cultural, and physical anthropology as well as ethnology and ethnohistory, archaeology and prehistory, folklore, and linguistics. For more information, see: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/CA

Timothy A. Kohler and Kathryn Kramer Turner. "Raiding for Women in the Pre-Hispanic Northern Pueblo Southwest?" Current Anthropology 47:6.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Chicago Press Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Chicago Press Journals. "Raiding For Women? Female Remains In Graveyards Reflect War In Pre-Hispanic New Mexico." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 November 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061112094745.htm>.
University of Chicago Press Journals. (2006, November 12). Raiding For Women? Female Remains In Graveyards Reflect War In Pre-Hispanic New Mexico. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061112094745.htm
University of Chicago Press Journals. "Raiding For Women? Female Remains In Graveyards Reflect War In Pre-Hispanic New Mexico." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061112094745.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

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