Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Novel Radiofrequency Treatment Shows Promise For Lumbar Pain

Date:
February 10, 2007
Source:
American Academy of Pain Medicine
Summary:
Intradiscal biacuplasty is an effective procedure to treat chronic discogenic pain, report researchers at the 23rd annual meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine in New Orleans. Improvement in pain scores and functional capacity can be observed much earlier with intradiscal biacuplasty than with intradiscal electrothermal therapy suggesting some additional or/and different mechanisms of action.

Intradiscal biacuplasty is an effective procedure to treat chronic discogenic pain, report researchers at the 23rd annual meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine in New Orleans. Improvement in pain scores and functional capacity can be observed much earlier with intradiscal biacuplasty than with intradiscal electrothermal therapy suggesting some additional or/and different mechanisms of action. It also appears to be more effective than intradiscal electrothermal therapy producing more than 50% of the pain relief in more than 50% of patients.

Intradiscal electrothermal therapy has produced variable results in the pain reduction and functional improvement in patients with axial discogenic pain. A new procedure called intradiscal biacuplasty utilizes two radiofrequency electrodes placed on the opposite posterolateral sides of the treated annulus. This procedure is minimally invasive and provides an alternative to lumbar fusion or disc replacement surgery.

The researchers completed a pilot study of 13 patients who received intradiscal biacuplasty and were followed for six months. Following provocative discography patients underwent intradiscal biacuplasty. There were significant improvements of all of the indices (SF-36, Oswestry, Visual Analog Scale pain scores and opioid use) at the first follow-up at one month. Those improvements were maintained throughout six months of follow-up.

At six months after intradiscal biacuplasty, patient's median pain scores measured by Visual Analog Scale decreased from 7 to 3. Functional capacity significantly improved with Oswestry scores median decrease from 25 to 18, and SF-36 PF median increase from 55 to 70. Median SF-36 BP score increased from 35 to 58. Median opioid use expressed in morphine sulphate mg equivalents decreased from 40 to 5 mg. There were no significant differences in any of the indices from first to sixth month after intradiscal biacuplasty. There were eight of 13 patients who had Visual Analog Scale pain scores decreased by three or more points. There were no complications perioperatively or during follow-up.

Investigators: Leonardo Kapural, MD, PhD, Alan Ng, MD, and Nagy Mekhail, MD, PhD., from Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Pain Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Pain Medicine. "Novel Radiofrequency Treatment Shows Promise For Lumbar Pain." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 February 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070209074755.htm>.
American Academy of Pain Medicine. (2007, February 10). Novel Radiofrequency Treatment Shows Promise For Lumbar Pain. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070209074755.htm
American Academy of Pain Medicine. "Novel Radiofrequency Treatment Shows Promise For Lumbar Pain." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070209074755.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins