Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Blood Marker Helps Predict Prognosis Among Those With Abdominal Infection

Date:
February 25, 2007
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Monitoring blood levels of a compound known as procalcitonin in patients with peritonitis (a serious intra-abdominal infection) could help identify patients at increased risk of organ failure and death, according to a report in the February issue of Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Monitoring blood levels of a compound known as procalcitonin in patients with peritonitis (a serious intra-abdominal infection) could help identify patients at increased risk of organ failure and death, according to a report in the February issue of Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Organ failure related to blood stream infection (sepsis) is the leading cause of death in surgical intensive care units, accounting for up to 60 percent of deaths, according to background information in the article. Peritonitis, infection of the layer of tissue lining the abdominal wall, is one of the most important sources of abdominal sepsis. Secondary peritonitis occurs as a consequence of another condition, such as a puncture in the gastrointestinal tract that allows the spread of bacteria, and generally this underlying condition must be treated surgically. However, continuing or new-onset abdominal sepsis continues to be a major problem for these patients following surgery, placing them at risk of multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (failure of two or more organ systems) and death.

"Facing this clinical dilemma, there is major interest in the search for an optimum diagnostic tool for an early, noninvasive and reliable diagnosis of abdominal infections and sepsis," the authors write. Currently, these conditions are diagnosed with imaging procedures and guided aspiration (suction) techniques. "An accurate and readily available biochemical marker for identifying patients at risk for abdominal infections would definitely contribute to easier and safer diagnosis."

Bettina M. Rau, M.D., University of the Saarland, Homber/Saar, Germany, and colleagues enrolled 82 patients with secondary peritonitis between 1999 and 2004 in a study to determine whether procalcitonin could be such a marker. Procalcitonin, an inactive precursor to a hormone known as calcitonin, has been shown to be more prevalent in patients with bacterial and fungal infections and sepsis. Bacterial specimens were obtained from the abdomens of all participants, as were other tissue cultures when sepsis was suspected. The patients were monitored from within 96 hours of their first symptoms to a maximum of 21 days for levels of procalcitonin and another marker of inflammation, C-reactive protein, and for signs of lung or kidney failure.

Over the follow-up period, 42 patients developed lung failure, 25 developed kidney failure, 35 had multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (31 cases of which were related to sepsis) and nine died. "Procalcitonin concentrations were most closely correlated with the development of septic multi-organ dysfunction syndrome, with peak levels occurring early after symptom onset or during the immediate post-operative course," the authors write. "No such correlation was observed for C-reactive protein."

It was possible to predict multi-organ dysfunction syndrome by assessing procalcitonin levels on the first two days following surgery; those with values of 10 nanograms per milliliter on two consecutive days were at higher risk. "Persisting procalcitonin levels greater than 1 nanogram per milliliter beyond the first week after disease onset strongly indicated non-survival and were significantly better than C-reactive protein in assessing overall prognosis," they continue.

"In summary, the present prospective, international multi-center study shows that monitoring of procalcitonin levels is a fast and reliable approach to assessing severe septic complications and overall prognosis in patients with secondary peritonitis," the authors conclude. "This single-test marker improves stratification of patients who will develop clinically relevant complications."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Blood Marker Helps Predict Prognosis Among Those With Abdominal Infection." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 February 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070220012336.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2007, February 25). Blood Marker Helps Predict Prognosis Among Those With Abdominal Infection. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070220012336.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Blood Marker Helps Predict Prognosis Among Those With Abdominal Infection." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070220012336.htm (accessed August 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

AP (Aug. 28, 2014) State health officials say testing has confirmed the presence of a killer amoeba in a water system serving three St. John the Baptist Parish towns. (Aug. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Who Could Be Burnt by WHO's E-Cigs Move?

Who Could Be Burnt by WHO's E-Cigs Move?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 28, 2014) The World Health Organisation has called for the regulation of electronic cigarettes as both tobacco and medical products. Ciara Lee looks at the impact of the move on the tobacco industry. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Director On Ebola Outbreak: 'It's Worse Than I Feared'

CDC Director On Ebola Outbreak: 'It's Worse Than I Feared'

Newsy (Aug. 28, 2014) CDC director Tom Frieden says the Ebola outbreak is even worse than he feared. But he also said there's still hope to contain it. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Amid Grave Ebola Estimates, US to Test Vaccine

Amid Grave Ebola Estimates, US to Test Vaccine

AP (Aug. 28, 2014) The National Institutes of Health will start the first human safety trials of an experimental Ebola vaccine next week, amid a grave estimate from the World Health Organization that Ebola cases in West Africa could top 20,000. (Aug. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins