Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Insights Into Osteosarcoma In Cats And Dogs May Improve Palliative Care

Date:
March 6, 2007
Source:
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Summary:
Researchers at the University of Illinois have found that a molecular pathway known to have a role in the progression of bone cancer in humans is also critical to the pathology of skeletal tumors in dogs and cats. Their work could lead to advances in the palliative care of companion animals afflicted with osteosarcoma.

Anne Barger, professor of veterinary pathobiology, and colleagues have found that a molecular pathway known to have a role in the progression of bone cancer in humans is also critical to the pathology of skeletal tumors in dogs and cats.
Credit: Photo by Chris Brown

Researchers at the University of Illinois have found that a molecular pathway known to have a role in the progression of bone cancer in humans is also critical to the pathology of skeletal tumors in dogs and cats. Their work could lead to advances in the palliative care of companion animals afflicted with osteosarcoma.

The research team, which included U. of I. pathobiology professor Anne Barger, examined the homeostatic role of an enzyme, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (known as RANK), and two key modulators of its activity: RANK ligand (RANK-L) and osteoprotegrin (OPG). RANK is one of a family of receptors that regulates bone and immune homeostasis. In health, RANK, RANK-L and OPG together keep the continual process of bone growth and resorption in balance.

Bone tumors presumably derail this homeostatic process, however, by upregulating RANK-L expression. RANK-L binds to RANK, stimulating the production and activation of osteoclasts (bone cells that increase the breakdown of bone tissue).

OPG counter-regulates RANK-L by blocking its ability to bind to RANK.

Eventual therapeutic interventions may make use of OPG or other RANK-L inhibitors to slow the process of bone destruction in skeletal tumors in cats and dogs, Barger said. Although not a cure, this could reduce the pain and other complications associated with bone cancer. Such therapies have proven effective at reducing pathologic bone loss in human bone cancer patients.

The researchers are the first to verify that the expression of this protein, which worsens the effects of bone cancer in humans, also occurs in cats and dogs with skeletal tumors. Their study appears in the January-February issue of the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

“Osteosarcoma is much more common in veterinary medicine than in human medicine,” Barger said. “And in dogs it is fairly common.”

Other studies have reported a tenfold greater incidence of bone cancer in dogs than in humans.

“Owners often make decisions to euthanize based on pain,” Barger said. “If we can lessen the pain associated with the tumor we can improve the quality of life and the lifespan.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "Insights Into Osteosarcoma In Cats And Dogs May Improve Palliative Care." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 March 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070302082345.htm>.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (2007, March 6). Insights Into Osteosarcoma In Cats And Dogs May Improve Palliative Care. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070302082345.htm
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "Insights Into Osteosarcoma In Cats And Dogs May Improve Palliative Care." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070302082345.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Health officials are working to fast-track a vaccine — the West-African Ebola outbreak has killed more than 700. But why didn't we already have one? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Previous studies have made the link between birth control and breast cancer, but the latest makes the link to high-estrogen oral contraceptives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

Reuters - US Online Video (July 31, 2014) The Republican-led House of Representatives votes to sue President Obama, accusing him of overstepping his executive authority in making changes to the Affordable Care Act. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Uganda on Alert for Ebola but No Confirmed Cases

Uganda on Alert for Ebola but No Confirmed Cases

AFP (July 31, 2014) Uganda's health minister said on Thursday that there are no confirmed cases of Ebola in the country, but that it remained on alert for cases of the deadly virus. Uganda has suffered Ebola outbreaks in the past, most recently in 2012. Duration: 00:59 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins