Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Bile Duct Obstruction Is Correlated WIth Ductal Cancer, Study Shows

Date:
May 1, 2007
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Summary:
When bile duct cancer cells were placed in the liver of animals with bile duct obstruction, they grew more rapidly than identical cells placed in animals without bile duct obstruction. In fact, half of the total liver mass of the rats with bile duct obstruction became replaced by cancer cells within three weeks compared to only 16 percent of that of animals without bile duct obstruction.

When bile duct cancer cells were placed in the liver of animals with bile duct obstruction, they grew more rapidly than identical cells placed in animals without bile duct obstruction. In fact, half of the total liver mass of the rats with bile duct obstruction became replaced by cancer cells within three weeks compared to only 16 percent of that of animals without bile duct obstruction.

Related Articles


Perhaps even more important, the cancers metastized outside the liver (as they frequently do in human patients with advanced bile duct cancer) only in the animals with bile duct obstruction.

Virginia Commonwealth University scientist Dr. Alphonse Sirica presented the findings at Experimental Biology 2007 in Washington, DC. His presentation, on April 29, is part of the scientific program of the American Society for Investigative Pathology.

The bile ducts are tubes that carry bile (a liquid secreted by the liver that contains cholesterol, bile salts, and waste products) from the liver to the gallbladder and small intestine. Bile duct obstruction has long been known to be present in both malignant and nonmalignant liver disease (jaundice, for example), but before the study by Dr. Sirica and his colleagues the direct effect of such obstruction on bile duct cancer cell growth and aggressiveness had not been previously investigated.

These new findings are highly significant for two reasons, says Dr. Sirica.

First, they establish an important correlation between bile duct obstruction and bile duct cancer, suggesting growth regulatory mechanisms that could be highly significant in the progression of the cancer and that could become good molecular targets for drug therapy.

Second, they establish a unique preclinical model of how bile duct cancer in liver progresses that can be used to rapidly test and evaluate novel molecular treatment strategies.

Such strategies are badly needed for this understudied cancer, adds Dr. Sirica. The incidence and mortality of cholangiocarcinoma, the primary cancer of the bile ducts, is increasing worldwide. Some 3,500 new cases are now diagnosed annually in the United States. Survival rates remain dismally low because most patients have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis and thus are poor candidates for the current best treatment, surgical resection. Although there are some known risk factors for the disease (such as primary sclerosing cholangitis), the cause of most cases remain unknown and the cellular and molecular changes that accompany the disease have not been well understood.

This study is part of ongoing work in Dr. Sirica's laboratory aimed at identifying altered growth factor signaling pathways in cholangiocarcinoma that may be exploited as potential molecular targets for therapy. Dr. Sirica's co-authors for the Experimental Biology 2007 presentation are Dr. Zichen Zhang, Dr. Toru Asano, Dr. Xue-Ning Shen, Deanna J. Ward and Dr. Arvind Mahatme. Support for the work came from the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Bile Duct Obstruction Is Correlated WIth Ductal Cancer, Study Shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 May 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070429113500.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. (2007, May 1). Bile Duct Obstruction Is Correlated WIth Ductal Cancer, Study Shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070429113500.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Bile Duct Obstruction Is Correlated WIth Ductal Cancer, Study Shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070429113500.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Scientists in Amsterdam say couples transfer tens of millions of microbes when they kiss, encouraging healthy exposure to bacteria. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Cambridge scientists have unravelled the genetic code of a rare tapeworm that lived inside a patient's brain for at least four year. Researchers hope it will present new opportunities to diagnose and treat this invasive parasite. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins