Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cat Hair At Home Poses An Allergy Risk, Particularly For Young Children

Date:
May 3, 2007
Source:
GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health
Summary:
Cats and cat allergens in the home clearly raise the risk of the allergic sensitization of children up to the age of two. For older children, however, the influence of the environment at home on the development of cat allergen sensitization decreases. The research is based on data from more than 2,000 children.

Cats and cat allergens in the home clearly raise the risk of the allergic sensitization of children up to the age of two.  For older children, however, the influence of the environment at home on the development of cat allergen sensitization decreases.  This is the conclusion reached by scientists from the GSF – National Research Center for Environment and Health (GSF), Helmholtz-Association, when they evaluated the data of more than 2,000 children from Leipzig and Munich.

Related Articles


The study was published by Chih-Mei Chen et al. in the May edition of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Researchers noted that the journal did not approve  earlier papers, according to which contact with cat allergens during the first few months of a child’s life has a protective effect. The team of authors could even show that apart from keeping cats, even just repeated contact with cat hair within or outside the parental household increases the frequency of allergic sensitization on the basis of the detection of IgE-specific antibodies against cat allergens.

The study is based on data of the multicentric LISA study. LISA stands for Lifestyle – Immune - System – Allergy and is intended to demonstrate the influence of lifestyle on the immune system and the development of allergic diseases in children. Apart from the GSF – Research Center for Environment and Health (GSF) and the Centre for Environmental Research Halle Leipzig (UFZ), other university and clinical partners are also involved. In the framework of the study the parents of the children born between late 1997 and early 1999 were repeatedly questioned about different family and health parameters as well as the frequency of contact with cats and other pets.

The longitudinal analysis of the development of allergic sensitization due to contact with cats, as it has just been published, also relies on a house dust sample taken from the parental home three months after each child’s birth, in which cat allergens were determined, as well as on the determination of the content of IgE antibodies to cat allergens in the children’s blood. The blood tests were carried out at the age of two and six years.

Up to the age of two the scientists found clear connections between exposure to cat allergens at home and the frequency of allergic sensitization. This connection was found to a lesser extent in six-year-old health outcomes “Contact with cat allergens at home does not have the main significance in this age group,” explains the head of the research unit Environmental Epidemiology at the GSF Institute of Epidemiology, Dr. Joachim Heinrich. Due to their greater range of action older children also come into contact with animal hair, when they are with friends and relatives, in child-care centres and playgrounds, and can get sensitized there. Statistical connections on the basis of cat allergen exposure at home are blurred by exposure outside the children’s homes.

In all the scientists found allergic sensitization to cat allergens in 1.3 per cent of the two-year-old and 5 per cent of the six-year-old children.

“The most important risk factor for allergies in children,“ Joachim Heinrich, “is, however, still the family history. If the parents suffer from hay fever, asthma or pet allergies, their children are more likely to also show allergic symptoms”. The study also shows that risk families in particular must still be advised not to keep cats and to avoid contact with cats in general. This, however, does not guarantee sufficient protection from allergic sensitization with cat allergens.

Article: Chen, C-M, Rzehak P, Zutavern A, Fahlbusch B, Bischof W, Herbarth O, Borte M, Lehmann I, Behrendt H, Krδmer U, Wichmann HE, Heinrich J: Longitudinal study on cat allergen exposure and the development of allergy in young children. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, May 2007

[doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2007.02.017]


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health. "Cat Hair At Home Poses An Allergy Risk, Particularly For Young Children." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 May 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070502111517.htm>.
GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health. (2007, May 3). Cat Hair At Home Poses An Allergy Risk, Particularly For Young Children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070502111517.htm
GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health. "Cat Hair At Home Poses An Allergy Risk, Particularly For Young Children." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070502111517.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) — The MelaFind device is a pain-free way to check suspicious moles for melanoma, without the need for a biopsy. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Battling Multiple Myeloma

Battling Multiple Myeloma

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) — The answer isn’t always found in new drugs – repurposing an ‘old’ drug that could mean better multiple myeloma treatment, and hope. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) — New information that is linking chronic inflammation in the prostate and prostate cancer, which may help doctors and patients prevent cancer in the future. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) — Blood transfusions are proving crucial to young sickle cell patients by helping prevent strokes, even when there is no outward sign of brain injury. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins